Honda xl250 engine

Honda xl250 engine DEFAULT

Honda XL 250

Make Model

Honda XL 250

Year

1972 - 73

Engine

Four stroke, single cylinder, OHC

Capacity

248 cc / 15.1 cu-in
Bore x Stroke74 X 57.8 mm
Cooling SystemAir cooled
Compression Ratio9.1:1

Induction

Single 28mm Keihin carburettor

Ignition 

Battery and coil
StartingKick

Max Power

23.4 hp 17.5 KW @ 8000 rpm

Max Torque

NA
ClutchMultiple disc in oil bath

Transmission 

5 Speed 
Final DriveChain
FrameSemi double cradle

Front Suspension

Telescopic forks

Rear Suspension

Swinging fork

Front Brakes

150 mm Drum

Rear Brakes

140 mm Drum

Front Tyre

2.75 -21

Rear Tyre

4.00 -18

Weight

135.6 kg / 299 lbs

Fuel Capacity

9.5 Litres / 1.7 US gal

XL History

Honda XL250 is a four-stroke 250 cc motorcycle from Honda introduced in 1972 and manufactured through most of the 1980s. When it appeared it was the first modern four-stroke enduro motorcycle and the first mass-produced four-valve motorcycle. (The first four-valve single was the Ricardo Triumph four-valve of the 1920s, and the first four-valve engine was the Indian 8-valve V2 racer of 1911.)

The XL250, and the later XL350, laid the groundwork for the revolutionary big modern four-stroke-enduro wave.
The XL250 is an "enduro" or dual-sport bike meaning it physically looks like a dirt bike, and shares many characteristics with a dirt bike, but it is street-legal and intended for on- and off-road use. The bike is completely mechanically operated as there are no hydraulics on the bike, except the XL350R and XL600R. The 250cc 4-stroke motor produces 24 horsepower at the wheel. The bike weighs 288 lbs with oil, grease, and petrol. Fuel capacity is 2.4 gallons (9.5 litres). Demand for this model has remained high among collectors and enthusiasts. An interesting observation with the XL250s models was their narrow streamlining, being only 12 inches at their widest point excluding the handlebars.

The 1980 Xl250 introduced few changes, however during its production the rear chain tensioner was added.
The 1981 XL250S was the last year to have the unique 23-inch front wheel, rear twin shock, and 6-volt electrical system. It also had upgraded rear brakes in a larger hub and a modified 5 plate clutch, and handsome twin speedo and tacho gauges in the Australian, continental variants. In 1982 the engine had the balancing cam sprocket driven rather than chain making the engine quieter and a six-speed gearbox was introduced with an automatic cam chain tensioner. From 1982 Honda reverted to the 21-inch front wheel and introduced the rear single shock suspension, known as the Pro-Link, and a 12-volt system. The 1984 to1987 models were equipped with dual carburetors and the RFVC type of engine.
1987 marked the final year of the XL250R and XL600R for the USA. The XL series were replaced with the short-lived NX series in 1988 to1990. In 1992, Honda began the XR250L and XR650L, which are street legal and closely follow the roots of the XL series.

The early 1970s witnessed a flurry of development in off-road and dual-purpose bikes that is still without peer for its diversity and excellence in execution. This was an era of free-wheeling experimentation; the desert racing scene was huge at this time, and on any given weekend hundreds of hard-bitten racers would line up toe-to-toe on everything from 90cc two-strokes to 650cc British twin-cylinder desert sleds.

Two-stroke motorcycles from Europe were often a dominant force in racing at this time, and although Honda had achieved some success with the SL-350, a dual-purpose variant of the venerable road-going CB350 twin, dealers and consumers alike were begging for a purpose-built Honda dirt bike.

Honda delivered with the 1972 XL250 Motosport, a single-cylinder thumper with a trick four-valve head, upswept exhaust system and a serious off-road chassis, high fenders and all.

The first XL wasn't perfect, but it was definitely inspired, as Cycle magazine enthused about "Honda's first-declared all-out dirt bike," in its April 1972 ride test of the XL250 Motosport. Specifically, the technical analysis virtually waxed poetic about the elegant four-valve head, and raved that "the intake port is divided upstream of the valve-heads-a casting masterpiece!"

Other comments included, "It almost goes without saying that the bike is beautiful: clean, unexaggerated, functional, subtle, and perhaps even a bit spartan." As a foreshadowing of Honda four-strokes to come, the magazine also remarked, "Once in motion, the bike pulls like a tractor... opening the throttle produces an instant surge of acceleration." Compared to the Spanish Bultaco Matador, one of the premier all-out off-road bikes of the early 1970s, Cycle editors declared "The Honda is much faster. On straight sections, the XL would inexorably pull away and keep on pulling away."

In closing, the road test summed up the 1972 XL250 in the following fashion: "Once again Honda has produced a dirt bike that is perfect for the off-road enthusiast who wants a civilized bike that requires no huge maintenance hassle, doesn't use a great amount of fuel, and isn't required to get him across really bad country in any particular hurry."



Ironically, those words would resound with a hollow thud all too soon. A few months later, a race report in the October 1972 issue by Cycle's desert aficionado Dale Boller detailed how the XL250 took the overall win at the much-vaunted Virginia City Grand Prix. This event was described as a "money-paying half-scramble, half-motocross affair" that tallied 10 laps over an incredibly rugged 16-mile course. Case in point: out of the 170 entrants in the Sunday main event, only 73 finished!
 

Regarding the event-winning XL250, "Ron Jones was riding one of the four-valve Hondas, the machine all of the expert magazine road-testers said would never be a threat in major competition. But despite a field of darn good riders on 400 Ajays, Huskys and Maicos, 360 CZs and big Beezers and Triumphs, Jones smoked them all on his 250 Honda."

Boller went on to explain how Jones had taken his new 250 Motosport right out of the crate, removed the street-going bits and pieces, added some full knobbies, a skid plate and a few other odds and ends before taking his place on the starting line with only 25 miles on the odometer! For his efforts, Ron Jones took home a 10-pound brick of solid Comstock silver. For Honda's four-stroke single-cylinder dirt bikes, there was much, much more to come.

Sours: https://www.motorcyclespecs.co.za/model/Honda/honda_xl250_72.html

Honda XL250: history, specs, pictures


Honda XL250 is a four stroke 250cc motorcycle from Honda introduced in 1972 and manufactured through most of the 1980's. It is an "enduro" or "dual purpose" bike meaning it physically looks like a dirt bike, and shares many characteristics with a dirt bike, but it is street legal. The bike is completely mechanically operated as there are no hydraulics on the bike. The 250cc motor produces 24 horsepower and the bike weighs 288lbs with oil, grease, and gasoline. Fuel capacity is 2.388 gallons. Demand for this model has remained high among collectors and enthusiasts. It could reach a top speed of 80 mph (128 km/h). Claimed horsepower was 23.47 HP (17.5 KW) @ 8000 RPM.

Engine[edit | edit source]

The engine was a air cooled single cylinder, four-stroke. A 75.0mm bore x 56.5mm stroke yielded a displacement of 249.0 cubic centimeters. Fuel was supplied by a single carburetor. The engine's 4 valves were operated by a single overhead camshaft (OHC).

Drive[edit | edit source]

The bike has a 6-speed transmission.

Chassis[edit | edit source]

It came with a 3.00-21 front tire and a 4.60-17 rear tire. Stopping was achieved via expanding brake in the front and a expanding brake in the rear. The front suspension was a Air assisted telescopic fork while the rear was equipped with a dual shock swing arm. The XL250R was fitted with a 2.38 Gallon (9.00 Liters) fuel tank.

Honda XL250[edit | edit source]

1972-73 XL250K0[edit | edit source]

  • 1972 Honda Motosport in Custom Silver Metallic

  • 1972 Honda Motosport in Custom Silver Metallic

  • 1972 Honda Motosport in Custom Silver Metallic

  • 1972 Honda Motosport in Custom Silver Metallic

  • 1972 Honda Motosport in Custom Silver Metallic

  • 1972 Honda XL250K0 in Silver

  • 1972 Honda XL250K0 in Silver

  • 1972 Honda XL250K0 in Silver

  • 1972 Honda XL250K0 in Silver

  • 1972 Honda XL250K0 in Silver

  • 1972 Honda XL250K0 in Silver

  • 1972 Honda XL250K0 in Silver

  • 1972 Honda XL250K0 in Silver

  • 1972 Honda XL250K0 in Silver

The Honda Motosport 250 XL250 was sold in 1972-73. One color was available: Custom Silver Metallic. The fuel tank, fenders, and headlight shell were silver while the fuel tank stripes and fender stripes were red. The "MOTOSPORT 250" muffler emblem was red and white. The side cover was black without emblems. The engine was a 248cc 4-stroke OHC 4-valve single cylinder with a 5-speed transmission. The frame serial number began XL250-1000049 while it is significant that the engine serial number began SL250E-1000001 rather than XL -- which shows its relation to the Motosport series.

1974[edit | edit source]

  • 1974 Honda XL250 in Blue/Silver

  • 1974 Honda XL250 in Blue/Silver

  • 1974 Honda XL250 in Blue/Silver


The XL250K1 was sold in 1974 in tornado Blue Metallic. The gas tank stripes were orange and black. The "XL250" muffler and side cover emblems were orange and white. The side cover and headlight shell were black. The instrumentation was tilted toward the rider. The engine was a 248cc 4-stroke OHC 4-valve single cylinder with a 5-speed transmission. The serial number began XL250-2000001. The engine serial number began XL250E not SL250E.

1975 XL250K2[edit | edit source]

  • 1975 Honda XL250K2 in Black/Red

  • 1975 Honda XL250K2 in Black/Red

  • 1975 Honda XL250K2 in Black/Red

  • 1975 Honda XL250K2 in Black/Red

  • 1975 Honda XL250K2 in Black/Red

  • 1975 Honda XL250K2 in Black/Red

  • 1975 Honda XL250K2 in Black/Red

  • 1975 Honda XL250K2 in Black/Red

  • 1975 Honda XL250K2 in Black/Red

  • 1975 Honda XL250K2 in Black/Red

  • 1975 Honda XL250K2 in Black/Red

  • 1975 Honda XL250K2 in Black/Red


The XL250K2 was sold in 1975 in Excel Black with Red. The gas tank was a 2-tone red and black. The fenders and side covers were black. The "XL250" muffler and side cover emblems were red and white. The headlight shell was silver. The engine was a 248cc 4-stroke OHC 4-valve single cylinder with a 5-speed transmission. The serial number began XL250-3000001.

1976[edit | edit source]


The XL250'76 was sold in 1976 in one color: Candy Sapphire Blue with white. The gas tank and side covers were blue. The fenders were white, color impregnated plastic. The frame was new and the chassis design featured an upswept exhaust. The intake manifold was center mounted. The engine was a 248cc 4-stroke OHC 4-valve single cylinder with a 5-speed transmission. The serial number began XL250-4000001.

Honda XL250S[edit | edit source]

1978[edit | edit source]


The XL250S'78 was sold in 1978 in one color: Tahitian Red. The gas tank stripes were black, red, and light orange. The "HONDA" tank decal was white. The "XL250S" side cover decal was black and white. The front wheel was 23" while the back was 18". The instrumentation featured only a speedometer. The engine was a 249cc OHC 4-valve single cylinder with 2 head pipes. The transmission was a 5-speed. The serial number began XL250S-5000041.

1979[edit | edit source]

The XL250S'79 was sold in 1979 in Tahitian Red. The gas tank stripes were black, red, and yellow. The "HONDA" tank logo was black. The front wheel was 23" while the back was 18". The instrumentation featured only a speedometer. The engine was a 249cc OHC 4-valve single cylinder with 2 head pipes. The transmission was a 5-speed. The serial number began XL250S-5100007.

1980[edit | edit source]


The XL250S'80 was sold in 1980 in Helios Red. The gas tank and side cover stripes were red, orange, and white. The "HONDA" tank logo was red outlined in white. The "XL250S" side cover logo was white. The control levers and kickstarter arm were black. The speedometer had an 85 mph (135 km) limit. The front wheel was 23" while the back was 18". The instrumentation featured only a speedometer. The engine was a 249cc OHC 4-valve single cylinder with 2 head pipes. The transmission was a 5-speed. The serial number began XL250-2000001.

1981[edit | edit source]


The XL250S'81 was sold in 1981 in Monza Red and Black. The gas tank and side covers were 2-tone red and black. The "HONDA" tank logo was black. The "XL250S" side cover logo was red and white. The swingarm was painted silver. The front wheel was 23" while the back was 18". The control levers and kickstarter arm were black. There was a 2-piece instrumentation: speedometer and indicator light pod. The speedometer had an 85 mph (135 km) limit. The instrumentation featured only a speedometer. The engine was a 249cc OHC 4- valve single cylinder with 2 head pipes. The transmission was a 5-speed. The serial number began JH2MD010*BM300001.

Honda XL250R[edit | edit source]

1982[edit | edit source]

The XL250R'82 was built in 1982 in Monza Red. The gas tank, side covers, fenders, and frame were red. The engine was black while the swing arm was silver. The front wheel was 21" while the back was 17". It now had a 12-volt electrical system and Pro-Link suspension. The engine was a 249cc OHC 4-valve single cylinder with 2 exhaust pipes. The transmission was a 6-speed. The serial number began JH2MD030*CM000008.

1983[edit | edit source]


The XL250R'83 was sold in 1983 in Monza Red. The "XL" logo on the side of the seat was solid white. The "250R" side cover had a graphic design. The gas tank, side covers, fenders, and frame were red. The engine was black while the swing arm was silver. The front wheel was 21" while the back was 17". It now had a 12-volt electrical system and Pro-Link suspension. The engine was a 249cc OHC 4-valve single cylinder with 2 exhaust pipes. The transmission was a 6-speed. The serial number began JH2MD030*DM100001.

1984[edit | edit source]

The XL250R'84 was sold in 1984 in Monza Red. The headlamp was rectangular with a number plate cowling. The seat and fork boots were black. The "250R" side cover decal was white while the number plate panels were black. The front wheel was 21" while the back was 17". It now had a 12-volt electrical system and Pro-Link suspension. The engine was a 249cc OHC RFVC single cylinder with 2 carburetors and 2 head pipes. It also had a 6-speed transmission.

  • Engine: RFVC radial valve, 249cc dual-carburetor engine
  • Suspension: Pro-Link™ rear suspension
  • Wheelbase: 1380mm (54.3 in.)
  • Dry weight: 117 kg (257.9 lb)
  • Seat height: 855mm (33.7 in.)
  • Front wheel travel: 220mm (8.7 in.)
  • Rear wheel travel: 195mm (7.7 in.)
  • The serial number began JH2MD110*EK000009.

1985[edit | edit source]

  • 1985 Honda XL250R in Flash Red

  • 1985 Honda XL250R in Flash Red

  • 1985 Honda XL250R in Flash Red

The XL250R'85 was sold in 1985 in Flash Red. The Honda wing tank decal was red, white, and blue. The "250R" tank decal was white and blue. The headlamp was rectangular with a number plate cowling. The seat and fork boots were blue. The number plate panels were yellow. The front wheel was 21" while the back was 17". It now had a 12-volt electrical system and Pro-Link suspension. The engine was a 249cc OHC RFVC single cylinder with 2 carburetors and 2 head pipes. It also had a 6-speed transmission. The serial number began JH2MD110*FK100007.

1986[edit | edit source]

  • Above image is a 86 shown with modified headlight Sylvania H4656 Halogen July 2010 (21,000km)(VO1KJM)


The XL250R'86 was sold in 1986 in Shasta White. The Honda wing tank decal was red, orange, and yellow. The "250R" tank decal was red and blue. The engine color was red. The number plate panels were black. The headlamp was rectangular with a number plate cowling. The front wheel was 21" while the back was 17". It now had a 12-volt electrical system and Pro-Link suspension. The engine was a 249cc OHC RFVC single cylinder with 2 carburetors and 2 head pipes. It also had a 6-speed transmission. The serial number began JH2MD110*GK200001.

  • TECHNICAL SPECIFICATION
  • Engine Capacity (Displacement) 249 ccm (15.19 cubic inches) Engine Type 1 cylinder
  • Bore x Stroke Ø75.0 mm x 56.5 mm (Ø2.95 inches x 2.22 inches) Bore/Stroke Ratio 1.33
  • Stroke 4 Valves per Cylinder 4 Timing System OHC Cooling System Air
  • Powertrain Gearbox 6 speed Chassis/Suspension/Brakes Front Brakes Drum Rear Brakes Drum
  • Front Tire 3.00-21 Rear Tire 4.60-17 Dimensions Curb Weight 131 kg (289 lb) Fuel Capacity 9 liters (2.38 gallons)
  • Performance Max Power 24.00 HP (17.5 kW) at 8000 RPM
  • Power/Weight Ratio 0.18 Hp/Kg Top Speed 128 km/h (80mph)
  • Acceleration (dart, speedup) time 0-100 km/h 7.6 seconds 0-60 mph 7.2 seconds
  • Drive chain 520/102 Sprockets 13t 40t

1987[edit | edit source]

The XL250R'87 was sold in 1987 in Shasta White. The Honda wing tank decal was red, white, and blue. The "250R" tank decal was blue and red. The headlamp was rectangular with a number plate cowling. The front wheel was 21" while the back was 17". The engine color was red. The number plate panels were black. It now had a 12-volt electrical system and Pro-Link suspension. The engine was a 249cc OHC RFVC single cylinder with 2 carburetors and 2 head pipes. It also had a 6-speed transmission. The serial number began JH2MD110*HK300001.

In Popular Culture[edit | edit source]

In Media[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

See Also[edit | edit source]

Sours: https://www.cyclechaos.com/wiki/Honda_XL250
  1. Chrome red bmw
  2. Vic meats
  3. Bluebird servos
  4. Blue chords
  5. 49cc racing carburetor

Honda XL250

A Honda XL250 Degree from the 1990s

Honda XL250 is a four-stroke 250 cc (15 cu in) motorcycle from Honda introduced in 1972 and manufactured through most of the 1980s. When it appeared it was the first modern four-stroke enduro motorcycle and the first mass-produced four-valve motorcycle. (The first four-valve single was the Ricardo Triumph four-valve of the 1920s, and the first four-valve engine was the Indian 8-valve V2 racer of 1911.)

The XL250, and the later XL350, laid the groundwork for the revolutionary big modern four-stroke-enduro wave.

The XL250 is an "enduro" or dual-sport bike meaning it physically looks like a dirt bike, and shares many characteristics with a dirt bike, but it is street-legal and intended for on- and off-road use. The bike is completely mechanically operated as there are no hydraulics on the bike. The 250cc 4-stroke motor produces 24 horsepower at the wheel. The bike weighs 288 lbs with oil, grease, and petrol. Fuel capacity is 2.4 gallons (9.5 litres). Demand for this model has remained high among collectors and enthusiasts. An interesting observation with the XL250s models was their narrow streamlining, being only 12 inches at their widest point excluding the handlebars.

The 1980 Xl250 introduced few changes, however during its production the rear chain tensioner was added.

The 1981 XL250S was the last year to have the unique 23-inch front wheel, rear twin shock, and 6-volt electrical system. It also had upgraded rear brakes in a larger hub and a modified 5 plate clutch, and handsome twin speedo and tacho gauges in the Australian, continental variants. In 1982, the engine had the balancing shaft gear driven rather than chain driven making the engine quieter and a six-speed gearbox was introduced as well as an automatic cam chain tensioner. In 1982, Honda reverted to the 21-inch front wheel and introduced the rear single shock suspension, known as the Pro-Link, and a 12-volt electrical system. The 1984–1987 models were equipped with dual, progressively operated carburetors, (the left one opened 1/4-1/2 way before the right one opened and both reached full throttle together), and the short stroke variant of the RFVC type engine.

1987 marked the final year of the XL250R and XL600R for the USA. The XL series were replaced with the short-lived NX250 in 1988–1990. In 1992, Honda began the XR250L and XR650L, which are street legal and closely follow the roots of the XL series.

The military version for Japan army

References[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honda_XL250
Honda XL250 with 500 engine

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Engine honda xl250

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Honda xl250s engine restoration (part 1)

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