Pneumatic hand engravers

Pneumatic hand engravers DEFAULT

Basic Pneumatic Engraving

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US6095256A - Hand-held pneumatic impact tool and method of controlling the same - Google Patents

Not applicable.

Not applicable.

Not applicable.

1. Field of Invention

This invention relates to a hand-held pneumatic power tool to be used for delicate hand engraving and stone setting in the hand engraving and jewelry field.

2. Description of Prior Art

Traditionally the tool used (and for a large part still used) for hand engraving and stone setting is a palm push graver tool. This traditional hand engraving tool consisted of the working point or graver set into a wood handle that fit comfortably into the palm of the hand. I have been a full time hand engraver for twenty years and find this traditional palm push graver is the most comfortable. A problem that arises with this traditional tool is that as the graver point is pushed through a cut, even in very fine engraving cuts, there is a small loss of control due to the force that is exerted. The outcome of this loss of control can be the graver point exiting out of the cut and the exerted force on the tool will cause slippage across the work. For heavier engraving cuts, engravers and stone setters have used a small hand-held hammer to strike against the graver to drive it through a cut. This has helped with some of the problem described above, as it is unnecessary to exert a great deal of force when the hammer does the work. A disadvantage with this hand-held hammer method is it leaves the engraving cuts jagged with small flats caused by each hammer impact.

In recent times impact power tools have been developed to attempt to aid the jeweler and engraver. For example, U.S. Pat. No. 4,694,912 (1987) and U.S. Pat. No. 5,203,417 (1993) both to Glaser, use compressed air through a rotary valve to generate pulses of air. This is used to move a piston in the hand-held device forward, depressing a spring and at the same time impacting the graver holder. This design has an adverse effect of loss of power or no power at all when the piston floats, caused when the pulses of air do not give the return spring time to return the piston. This is caused by the frequency of the air pulses being too close together and/or by too much air pressure in each pulse. Moreover, previous hand-held engraving impact tools such as U.S. Pat. No. 3,393,755 to Glaser and Rohner (1968) have required a separate, specialized source of vacuum air pulses to the hand-held device. In the case of U.S. Pat. No. 4,694,912 to Glaser (1987) described above, a specialized rotary valve is required as a means of power to rotate the valve to provide a source of air pulses to the hand-held impact device.

A more recent patent U.S. Pat. No. 5,515,930 to Glaser (1996) discloses a hand-held pneumatic apparatus. This hand-held impact tool also uses a spring, similar to the impact tools described above, for the return stroke of the piston. This spring has an unfavorable effect to the range of impacts that can be achieved with the device, as enough air pressure must be used to compress the spring sufficiently to enable the piston to come into contact with the graver holder or anvil. A spring that is very light in strength can be used and finer impacts will be achieved, but this results in insufficient high impact power when the user desires greater impact energy. On the other hand, if a stronger spring is used, air pressure will need to be increased to supply enough force to depress the heavier spring and this additional pressure will cause the piston to travel with more velocity and consequently the user discovers that the tool cannot achieve fine low power impacts, but only high power impacts. It should be noted that this described strength of spring and range of impacts problem also exists with impact tool disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 4,694,912 to Glaser (1987). Returning to U.S. Pat. No. 5,515,930 to Glaser (1996), this device also requires a special pressuresensing element within the foot valve to start the piston oscillating by giving a quick surge of higher air pressure. This is needed as the tool's housing and tip will vibrate excessively if the tool housing or tool tip is not held against a fixed work surface while the device is oscillating and therefore requires the tool to start after the tool tip is placed against the work with the surge of higher air pressure. This vibration on an operator's hand can quickly fatigue the hand and can also make it difficult and impractical to place the tool tip where desired to begin an engraving cut. In addition, the vibration can dull the tool tip or ruin the work if the user attempts to place the tool tip to the work while the device is oscillating. This tool therefore requires its tip to be set into the work before starting the oscillation and therefore requires the special sensing element to help it start with a surge of air pressure. The air pressure surge to start the oscillation can also cause a surge of harder impacts than desired, making fine engraving work impractical.

In accordance with the present invention a hand-held pneumatic impact tool comprises a handpiece, a foot-operated flow control valve and a hand operated flow control needle valve. The handpiece includes a housing having a cavity and annular shoulder accommodating a stepped piston dividing the cavity into three chambers.

Objects and Advantages

Accordingly, several objects and advantages of my invention are:

(a) to provide a hand-held pneumatic impact tool similar in size and shape to the traditional palm push engraving tool;

(b) to provide a hand-held pneumatic impact tool with superb control of very fine impacts for use in ultra fine hand engraving;

(c) to provide a hand-held pneumatic impact tool that has a wide range of power and that will not lose oscillating timing throughout a wide range of air pressures;

(d) to provide a hand-held pneumatic impact tool that is not dependant on a spring for the piston's return or impact stroke;

(e) to provide a hand-held pneumatic impact tool that will begin oscillation without requiring a surge of air pressure over the normal operating idling ready-state air pressure;

(f) to provide a hand-held pneumatic impact tool in which the idling ready-state can be controlled by the user's preference and needs;

(g) to provide a hand-held pneumatic impact tool that does not vibrate excessively allowing the user to set and place the tool tip into the work with confidence;

(h) to provide a hand-held pneumatic impact tool which allows the operator to adjust the position of the air line attachment to the impact tool to his or her comfort;

(i) to provide an adjustment within the hand-held pneumatic impact tool itself for the user to adjust the length and speed of the piston's stroke to his or her preference according to the type of engraving work that is being executed.

Further objects and advantages are to provide a hand-held pneumatic engraving tool in which the piston, once started oscillating with constant fine flow of air pressure will not stop unexpectedly between hand engraving operations, but return to a fine oscillating idle. Still further objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent from a consideration of the drawing and ensuing description.

Embodiments of the present invention are described below with reference to attached drawing figures, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the hand-held pneumatic impact tool apparatus in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a sectional view of a hand-held pneumatic impact tool constructed in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 3 is the same view as FIG. 2, differing in that the piston is occupying the extreme forward position;

FIG. 4 is the same view as FIG. 3, differing in that the piston is occupying not quite the extreme forward position;

FIG. 5 is the same view as FIG. 4, differing in that the piston is occupying a slight rearward position;

FIG. 6 illustrates a hand-held pneumatic impact tool in accordance with the present invention, in which the piston has an additional port hole;

FIG. 7 illustrates a hand-held pneumatic impact tool in accordance with the present invention, in which the housing has an adjusting means for the speed and length of piston stroke;

FIG. 8 illustrates a hand-held pneumatic impact tool in accordance with the present invention, in which the housing has in and out port passage ways leading to more convenient areas on the outside surface of the tool;

FIG. 9 is a sectional view taken along 9--9 of FIG. 10;

FIG. 10 is a sectional view of a housing of a hand-held pneumatic impact tool in accordance with the present invention, in which more than one entrance is presented to the intake port and the holding setscrew for the tool tip is rotated to a more convenient position;

FIG. 11 is a sectional view taken along 11--11 of FIG. 10;

FIG. 12 is an elevated, isometric view of the housing in FIG. 10 illustrated together with the other elements of a hand-held pneumatic impact tool in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 13 is a lowered, isometric view of the same hand-held pneumatic impact tool in accordance with the present invention as illustrated in FIG. 12;

FIG. 14 illustrates a hand-held pneumatic impact tool in accordance with the present invention with a widened annular shoulder within the cylinder together with a piston that has an accommodating porting configuration;

FIG. 15 is the same view as FIG. 14, differing in that the piston is occupying a rearward position;

FIG. 16 is the same view as FIG. 15, differing in that the piston is occupying an extreme rearward position;

FIG. 17 is a side sectional view of a foot-operated flow control valve assembly in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 18 is a top sectional view of an air flow valve contained in the foot-operated flow control valve assembly illustrated in FIG. 17; and

FIG. 19 is a sectional view of a needle valve in accordance with the present invention.

FIGS. 1-5 and FIGS. 17-19

A hand-held pneumatic impact tool and method of controlling the same in accordance with the present invention is illustrated in FIG. 1. The apparatus includes an air supply line 28, a hand operated pressure regulator assembly 20, a foot-operated flow control valve assembly 22, a distribution line 32 extending between the hand operated pressure regulator assembly 20 and the foot-operated flow control valve assembly 22, an impact handpiece 26, a delivery line 38 and reduced diameter delivery line 40 extending between the foot-operated flow control valve assembly and the handpiece, and a hand-operated flow control needle valve 24 spliced between the distribution line 32 and delivery line 38 via lines 34 and 36.

The air supply line 28 connects the pressure regulator assembly 20 to a source of pressurized air, such as a conventional air compressor. The pressure regulator assembly 20 includes an inlet connected to the supply line 28, an outlet connected to the distribution line 32, and a valve for regulating airfow between the inlet and the outlet. In addition, the pressure regulator assembly 20 includes a pressure-sensing element for sensing the pressure of the air distributed from the regulator and for controlling the regulator to limit the pressure of the distributed air. A hand-operated knob 21 is connected to the pressure regulator assembly 20 for adjusting the regulated pressure distributed by the regulator. A gauge 30 is provided on the regulator to monitor the pressure being distributed. An additional element of the pressure regulator assembly is an air-cleaning filter 42 to filter the air that passes through the regulator.

The foot-operated flow control valve assembly 22 is illustrated in a sectional view in FIG. 17. A flow control valve 88 is firmly attached to a base 102. A foot pedal 92 is attached to a housing 104 by a pivot pin 90 permitting the foot pedal to pivot when the user depresses the pedal with his or her foot. A compression spring 94 is place between the base 102 and underside of the foot pedal to return the foot pedal to the original position when the user takes his or her foot off. Referring to the top sectional view of the flow control valve 88 in FIG. 18, a plunger holder 110 has a secured, airtight fit into a valve housing 100. A plunger 98 has a tapered shape within the two ends of the plunger. Depending on the position of plunger 98, two chambers 112 and 108 within a housing 100 can become in communication with each other. When the foot pedal is not depressed, a spring 118 will push the plunger out until the taper on the plunger mates with the taper in plunger holder 110 closing off communication and air flow between chambers 112 and 108. In FIG. 17 a protrusion 96 is firmly attached to the foot pedal 92. When the foot pedal is depressed, the protrusion 96 will press against plunger face 106 pushing the plunger into the flow control valve 88 and as a result push the plunger away from the mating taper within the plunger holder opening a communication passageway between chambers 112 and 108, illustrated in FIG. 18. The further the user depresses the foot pedal, the larger the opening between the mating taper surfaces of the plunger and the plunger holder become, permitting more air to flow between chambers 112 and 108. Referring to FIG. 1 and FIG. 18 chamber 112 is connected and is in communication with the distribution line 32 (FIG. 1) with a screw-in barb connector 116. Chamber 108 is connected and is in communication with the delivery line 38 (FIG. 1) with a screw-in barb connector 114.

Referring to the hand-operated flow control needle valve assembly 24 illustrated in FIG. 19, an adjusting screw 120 has a taper on the end that when threaded all the way into housing 122 will fit against a mating taper in housing 122. This tapered hole within housing 122 intersects a portion of each of chamber 126 and chamber 130. When this adjusting screw is threaded all the way into housing 122 it will block communication and air flow between chambers 126 and 130. When the adjusting screw 120 is threaded out it will open communication between the chambers permitting air flow. The more the adjusting screw is threaded out the more the air flow between the chambers. Referring to FIG. 1 and FIG. 19, chamber 126 is in communication with line 34, which is spliced into and in communication with the distribution line 32. Chamber 130 is in communication with line 36, which is spliced into and in communication with the delivery line 38. Both of the chambers 126 and 130 have screw-in barb connectors 124 and 128 for attaching the lines 34 and 36.

An impact handpiece 26a, is illustrated in FIG. 2 and includes a cylindrical housing 76 with a cavity and an annular shoulder 70 accommodating a two-step piston 66 that can move axially within the housing cavity and dividing the cavity into the following three chambers:

a head chamber 50 defined by the front piston face 74, the cavity bottom face 48, the walls of the housing, and one side of the annular shoulder 70. This head chamber constantly communicates with the atmosphere through the housing exhaust port 72;

a central chamber 68 defined by the piston step end face 67, the external diameter of the smaller step of the piston, the walls of the housing, and one side of the annular shoulder 70. In addition the annular shoulder 70 separates this central chamber from the head chamber. This central chamber constantly communicates with the compressed air source through housing intake port 52;

a rear chamber 64 defined by the rear piston face 62, an end cap 60, and the walls of the housing. Depending on the position of the piston relative to the housing, this rear chamber periodically communicates with a compressed air source through passage 56, piston port 54, and housing intake port 52, or with the atmosphere through passage 56, piston port 54, and housing exhaust port 72.

Tool tip 44 is held in the handpiece housing 76 by tightening setscrew 46. A handle 58 is comfortably shaped to fit into the palm of the hand and to provide bottom clearance as the tool is used over the work. The handle 58 is fixed onto the end cap 60. The end cap 60 in turn fits onto the housing 76 with an airtight seal. It should be noted that it is not shown in the illustrations, but a gasket, O-ring, or equivalent can be used between the housing 76 and end cap 60 to help provide an airtight seal together with a setscrew to hold the end cap on the housing.

Operation--FIGS. 1-5

The hand-held impact tool operates as follows. Referring to FIG. 2, when compressed air is introduced to the housing intake port 52 and piston 66 is in a position illustrated in FIG. 2, compressed air will fill the central chamber 68 and also the rear chamber 64 via piston port 54 and passage 56. The air pressure in the central chamber will attempt to push the piston further to the rear of the tool by pressing against the piston step end face 67, but the air pressure in the rear chamber 64 will attempt to push the piston in the opposite direction toward the front of the cavity by pressing against the rear piston face 62. Because the surface area of the rear piston face 62 is greater than the surface area of piston step end face 67, the piston will shift toward the front of the cavity until the front piston face 74 collides with the end of the cavity bottom face 48, thus delivering an impact. While the piston was traveling toward the cavity bottom face, piston port 54 for a short time was aligned with annular shoulder 70 and the compressed air from the central chamber was the shut off to piston port 54 and thus to the rear chamber 64. With continuing movement of the piston toward the cavity bottom face 48 piston, port 54 became in communication with head chamber 50 permitting the air pressure that was built up in the rear chamber 64 to be released into the atmosphere through passage 56 in the piston, to the head chamber 50, and finally out housing exhaust port 72. With the piston in this front most position illustrated in FIG. 3 and the air pressure released out of the rear chamber, the air pressure in the central chamber will press against the piston step end face 67 and together with an impacting recoil shift the piston back to the rearward position illustrated in FIG. 2. With the piston in this rearward position, piston port 54 is now in communication with central chamber 68 and air pressure from housing intake port 52. The air pressure will now again build in rear chamber 64 through passage 56 and the process is repeated, thus oscillating the piston.

Illustrations FIG. 4 and FIG. 5 depict the idling ready-state of the impact handpiece. This idling state is similar to what is described above except the piston oscillates with a very short movement stroke and without the front piston face 74 colliding or impacting with the cavity bottom face 48. This idling state can be achieved with very short movement strokes because piston port 54 is the same width as the annular shoulder 70. With this configuration the piston port 54 can move just a few thousandths of an inch to either side from alignment with the annular shoulder 70 for receiving and exhausting sufficient air pressure to oscillate the piston. The air pressure and air flow required for this idling oscillation are very low. FIG. 4 depicts the idling state with the piston shifted to the front position and the piston port 54 in communication with head chamber 50. FIG. 5 illustrates the idling state with the piston shifted to the rear position and piston port 54 in communication with central chamber 68.

Referring to FIG. 1, the hand operated pressure regulator assembly 20, the foot-operated flow control valve assembly 22, and the hand operated flow control needle valve 24 operate together supplying the needed airflow to the handpiece as follows. With an air compressor or the like supplying air pressure through the supply line 28, the hand-operated pressure regulator 20 is adjusted to the desired pressure by turning knob 21 and viewing pressure gauge 30. The hand-operated flow control needle valve 24 is adjusted to permit a fine flow of air between the distribution line 32 and delivery line 38 and the reduced diameter delivery line 40 and finally to the handpiece 26. This will permit the piston to begin oscillating in the idling state. The hand-operated flow control needle valve 24 is adjusted so that the idling is faint with slight piston oscillation. The idling impact handpiece is now ready for impact operation. The user places the idling impact tool's graver or tool tip onto the work and slowly depresses the foot pedal of the foot-operated flow control valve assembly 22. The piston in the handpiece will begin delivering light impacts. As the user continues to depress the foot pedal, thus increasing air pressure to the handpiece, the piston will deliver harder and harder impacts. When the user has finished an engraving or stone setting operation he or she lets up on the foot pedal and the impact tool will return to the idling oscillation ready-state.

FIG. 6--Second Embodiment

Referring to FIG. 6, a second embodiment of the impact handpiece, 26b, is depicted. Impact handpiece 26b is similar to handpiece 26a (illustrated in FIG. 2, FIG. 3, FIG. 4, and FIG. 5) in all but one respect. Handpiece 26b has a piston port 54 similar to handpiece 26a but handpiece 26b has an additional small piston port 78. This small piston port 78 hole is placed so that the front most edge of the hole is aligned perpendicular to the front most edge of the piston port 54 hole. The small port aligned in this manner will aid in releasing more compressed air out of rear chamber 64 in less time when the piston is in its front most position (i.e. making an impact). This release will begin when the piston and front edges of piston port 54 and small piston port 78 become in communication with the head chamber 50. Lowering as much pressure as possible in the rear chamber 64 with the piston in this position allows the piston to travel further back in the return stroke. Longer return strokes are helpful in delivering harder impacts strokes since the piston has more time to accelerate to a greater velocity during the impact stroke. When this additional small piston port 78 communicates with the central chamber 68 it will also be used together with piston port 54 to fill rear chamber 64 faster which will shorten some of the return stroke, but in doing so places more air pressure into the rear chamber 64 increasing the power of the impact stroke. These port holes are positioned in such a manner that during a return stroke, piston port 54 will become in communication with central chamber 68 before small piston port 78, helping give a slightly longer return stroke than if the port holes were the same width and position. It is not illustrated in FIG. 6, but more than one small piston port 78 may be included around the smaller piston step diameter in the same location illustrated for small piston port 78 with an overall benefit in power to the impact stroke.

FIG. 7--Third Embodiment

Referring to FIG. 7, a third embodiment of the impact handpiece, 26c, is depicted. Impact handpiece 26c is similar in all respects to handpiece 26b (illustrated in FIG. 6) except that handpiece 26c has an addition of two setscrews 80 and 82. Setscrew 80 has been included to the bottom of the cavity so that cavity bottom face 48a may be adjustable axially within the handpiece. Setscrew 82 has been included perpendicular to and in intersection with setscrew 80. Setscrew 82 is used to lock setscrew 80 in place once the user has setscrew 80 positioned to his or her preference. The user gains access to setscrew 82 by first removing tool tip 44 by loosing setscrew 46. The user may adjust setscrew 80 while the handpiece is oscillating. By adjusting setscrew 80, and thus cavity bottom face 48a, it is possible to adjust the speed that the impacts occur and the length of the return strokes, which will affect the overall impact power range of the handpiece. Adjusting setscrew 80, and thus cavity bottom face 48a, towards the front tool tip end of the handpiece and having piston 66a in its front most position (i.e. making an impact), piston port 54 and small piston port 78 openings will be positioned further into head chamber 50 creating a larger passage for air pressure in the rear chamber 64 to escape into the atmosphere. Lowering as much pressure as possible in the rear chamber 64 with the piston in this position allows the piston to travel further back in the return stroke. Longer return strokes are helpful in delivering harder impact strokes since the piston has more time to accelerate to a greater velocity during the impact stroke. In addition these longer impact strokes take more time to cycle, thus the strokes per minute slow down when adjusting setscrew 80 in the direction just described. When setscrew 80 is adjusted in the opposite direction than just described so that cavity bottom face 48a is moved away from the tool tip end of the handpiece and so that it protrudes further into the head chamber 50 and having piston 66a in its front most position (i.e. making an impact), piston port 54 and small piston port 78 openings will now be positioned not as far into head chamber 50, creating a smaller passage for air pressure in the rear chamber 64 to escape into the atmosphere. Since not as much air pressure can escape from rear chamber 64, the return stroke of the piston will not return as far into rear chamber 64. This effect will give the tool shorter and less hard impacts over all air pressure ranges and the piston will in addition oscillate faster when impacting. Being able to adjust the cavity bottom face 48a and thus the overall impact power range and impact speed helps make the impact handpiece versatile for each user's preference and work requirements.

FIG. 8--Fourth Embodiment

Referring to FIG. 8, a fourth embodiment of the impact handpiece, 26d, is depicted. Impact handpiece 26d is similar in respect to handpiece 26c (illustrated in FIG. 7) except the housing walls of housing 76b have been thickened so that there is room for housing intake port 52a and the housing exhaust port 72a to run parallel within the housing walls and out to a more user friendly location on the outside surface of the housing. Housing intake port 52a in FIG. 8 is illustrated coming out in a more forward position on the housing. This position is a more convenient one for delivery line 40 (FIG. 1) to be inserted than where it inserts on handpiece 26a, 26b, or 26c. As the user holds handpiece 26d in his or her hand, delivery line 40 is inserted in this more forward position on the handpiece so that the delivery line will ride next to the web of the hand between the thumb and index finger and may then be laid over the back of the hand, out of the way. In FIG. 8 housing exhaust port 72a is depicted coming to a more rearward location on the outside surface of housing 76b. In this position, next to handle 58, it is in a more out of the way position and it is less likely for the user to inadvertently cover or plug this exhaust port hole with his or her hand.

FIGS. 9-13--Fifth and Preferred Embodiment

In FIG. 9, FIG. 10, FIG. 11, FIG. 12, and FIG. 13 is illustrated a fifth and preferred embodiment. FIG. 9, FIG. 10, and FIG. 11 depict only the housing 76c element of this embodiment. All other elements except this illustrated housing 76c are identical to handpiece 26d in FIG. 8. A threaded hole 89 for the tool tip holding setscrew 46 (illustrated in FIG. 8) has been rotated 45 degrees in FIG. 10. FIG. 9 is a sectional view taken along 9--9 of FIG. 10 and illustrates the rotation of the threaded hole 89. This location is more convenient for the jeweler or engraver who needs to change or sharpen his or her tool tip often. It will also hold square tool tips most often used by jewelers and engravers in a rotated suitable position. Going back to FIG. 10, the housing intake port 52b has been modified over housing intake port 52a in FIG. 8. Housing intake port 52b in FIG. 10 runs through the housing walls to two additional positions on the outside of the housing. FIG. 11 is a sectional view taken along 11--11 of FIG. 10 and illustrates the two additional openings on either side of the housing 76c for delivery line 40 to be inserted. Isometric views in FIG. 12 and FIG. 13, further illustrate all three of the optional positions that the delivery line 40 can be inserted for the user's comfort. One of the openings to the housing intake port 52b is chosen by the user to insert delivery line 40 and plugs 84 and 86 illustrated in FIG. 12 are placed into the two openings that are not used.

FIGS. 14-16--Sixth Embodiment

Referring to FIG. 14, FIG. 15, and FIG. 16, is illustrated a sixth embodiment. In this embodiment the annular shoulder 70a has been widened axially within housing 76d. The small step diameter of piston 66b has also been lengthened to accommodate the widened annular shoulder. Three piston ports 55, 57 and 59 have been included in a radial array around the small diameter of the piston so that they communicate with passage 56 within the piston. A single piston port 61 that communicates with passage 56 is included and positioned slightly rearward so that the distance from the rearward edge of piston port 61 to the front edge of piston ports 55, 57, and 59 is the same distance as the width of annular shoulder 70a. In this configuration, and with piston 66b in a forward position as illustrated in FIG. 14, the air pressure that was in rear chamber 64 that pushed the piston to this front position will be released to the atmosphere through passage 56, piston ports 55, 57 and 59, into head chamber 50, and out into the atmosphere through housing exhaust port 72a. Air pressure in central chamber 68 from housing intake port 52a will press against piston step end face 67 and begin shifting the piston in a rearward direction causing a return stroke. Referring to FIG. 15, when single piston port 61 becomes in communication with central chamber 68 the air pressure from housing intake port 52a and central chamber 68 will fill rear chamber 64 through passage 56. Because the surface area of rear piston face 62 is greater than the surface area of piston step end face 67, the piston will change directions and begin the impact stroke.

The design of this embodiment is such that a longer return and thus harder impacts strokes are possible. The three piston ports 55, 57 and 59 enable the rear chamber 64 to lower its air pressure quickly when piston ports 55, 57 and 59 become in communication with the head chamber 50. During the return stroke and when the single piston port 61 becomes in communication with central chamber 68 it will take rear chamber 64 longer to fill through just this single piston port 61 with sufficient pressure to change the direction of the piston therefore creating a longer return stroke. Longer return strokes are helpful in delivering harder impact strokes since the piston has more time to accelerate to a greater velocity during the impact stroke. FIG. 16 illustrates an even longer return stroke developed when much more air pressure is supplied to the handpiece. As depicted with this length of return stroke, piston ports 55, 57 and 59 will become in communication with central chamber 68 together with single piston port 61. These piston ports 55, 57 and 59 will give an additional path for sufficient air pressure to build up in rear chamber 64 thus assuring a change of direction when the returning piston does return this far into the rear chamber. It should be noted that a groove might be employed around the outside circumference of the small step of the two-step piston in such a position that it communicates with piston ports 55, 57 and 59 to help with air exhaust. In addition it should be noted, that more than three piston ports could be included together in the location of piston ports 55, 57 and 59. Three were used in FIG. 14, FIG. 15 and FIG. 16 for the simplicity of illustration.

Accordingly, the reader will see that the hand-held impact tool of the invention provides superb control with a wide range of various impact adjustments for the individual needs of the engraver or jeweler. The porting configuration of the piston and housing, together with the annular shoulder provides the capability of an idling state of ultra fine piston oscillation. The piston port needs only to travel a few thousandths of an inch either way of alignment with the annular shoulder to receive sufficient air pressure to change directions. It is crucial for the engraver or jeweler user be able to place the tool tip down to the work while the tool is running in a ready-state without excessive vibration in the tool or tool tip. After the tool is in the work, the engraver or jeweler depresses the foot pedal valve, and the piston will begin taking longer strokes into the head and rear chambers until the strokes are long enough in the head chamber for the piston to begin impacting. These beginning impacts are ultra fine in energy and can be used for extremely fine hand engraving under a stereomicroscope. As the user continues to depress the foot pedal valve and further increases the air pressure, the piston will impact with increasing energy sufficient for hand engraving users who wish to engrave deeply and for jewelers who wish it for stone setting.

Furthermore, the invention has additional advantages in that:

it provides a hand-held impact tool similar in size and shape to the traditional, comfortable, palm push engraving tool;

it provides a hand-held impact tool with excellent control of fine impacts for use in ultra fine hand engraving;

it provides a hand-held impact tool that has a broad range of power and that will not lose oscillation timing throughout a wide range of air pressures;

it provides a hand-held impact tool that is not dependent on a spring for the piston's return or impact stroke;

it provides a hand-held impact tool that will begin oscillation without requiring a surge of air pressure over the normal operating idling ready-state air pressure;

it provides a hand-held impact tool with an idling ready-state, that can be controlled by the users' preference and needs;

it provides a hand-held impact tool that does not vibrate excessively, allowing the user to set and position the graver into the work with confidence;

it provides a hand-held impact tool, in which the position of the air line attachment to the impact tool can be adjusted by the operator for his or her comfort;

it provides an adjustment within the hand-held impact tool itself for adjustment of the length and speed of the piston stroke according to the type of engraving work that is being executed; and

it provides a hand-held impact tool in which the piston, once started oscillating in the idling ready-state with a constant fine flow of air pressure, will not stop unexpectedly between engraving cuts, but return to the fine oscillating idle when the foot pedal valve is released.

Although the invention has been described with reference to the illustrated and described embodiments, it should be noted that substitutions may be made and equivalents employed herein. For example, one or more additional housing exhaust ports 72 or 72a may be placed within the housing communicating with head chamber 50 and the atmosphere. In addition, an adjusting device can be used to lengthen or shorten the distance between piston port 54 and front piston face 74 that would give the equivalent result of the adjusting device described and illustrated in FIG. 7. Another example is housing 76, 76a, 76b, 76c, 76d, or a variation of the housings together with the annular shoulder 70 or 70a may be constructed of separate elements that are fixed or screwed together to achieve the equivalent overall construction of the housings. Still another example is any of the embodiments described or illustrated can employ a different method to hold tool tip 44 in the housings. Still another example is a groove may be employed with any of the embodiments around the outside circumference of the small step of the two-step piston in such a position that it intersects one or more than one piston port. Other examples are the features, methods, and devices employed in each of the embodiments may be mixed and matched with other features, methods or devices from the embodiments to create an equivalent, hybrid embodiment. Accordingly, the scope of the invention should be determined not by the embodiments illustrated, but by the appended claims and their legal equivalents.

Sours: https://patents.google.com/patent/US6095256A/en
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HeatSign Easy Use Portable Handheld CNC Pneumatic Metal Dot Peen Engraving Marking Machine

HS-PC series CNC Portable Dot Peen Marking  also call hand held pneumatic marking machine: With a touch screen, integrated CNC controller, and new generation software, this all-in-one handheld system can be used without a supporting computer. HS-PC02 with a small marking head with electromagnet and bracket basement, for an fast, accurate and useful engraving tool you can use almost anywhere.

What the hand held metal engraving machine can be used for ?

1.Fast Engraving Marking on engines, pistons, bodies, frames, chassis, connecting rods, cylinders, etc. for numbers, names, trademarks, and production dates.
2. Widely used in Automobile, the bodywork of motorcycle, car frame, automotive chassis, engine, vin, mechanical part, machine tool, metal pipe, gear, knife tool, pump body, valve, various hardness plastic products, hardware part, etc.
3. It also can work on various other metal parts, metalworking industry for marking steel, iron, copper, aluminum, and auto parts marking.  
(P.S. This machine need your side prepare air compressor connect to use.)


Why Choose Our Portable Engraving Marking Machine ?


What's Details of This Portable Dot Peen Engraving Machine?


Model Number

HS-PC02
Powerful and durable more than 5 years
Metal machine for printing, marking, engraving – Stylus printer, dot peen header
Big and heavy part flat surface
AC220V±10%~50Hz or AC110V±10%~50Hz
300W (air compressor excluded)
CNC controller integrated touch screen and powerful software
Characters, numbers, symbols, graphs outline , logo,2D data matrix  code etc.
Adjustable on marking software
0.02-0.5 mm (depending on materials)
30mm~40mm/s according to letter size
Metal or nonmetals with hardness under HRC60

Customized Soultions

HeatSign Marking Machine can customize solutions to your marking needs, providing you with marking efficiency, such as designing automated marking solutions for automatic feeding, automatic marking, or dot peen marking machine integration to your production line, which will help you further save labor costs.


Sours: https://www.toolots.com/easy-use-portable-pneumatic-dot-peen-marking-machine-metal-engraver.html
Pneumatic Engraver Handpiece Update: In working order (pt.2)

45 years - ArtGraver History  - by Steve Lindsay
History of Lindsay's gravers was originally written in 2000 and still resides
where the AirGravers were first introduced and sold.  (link)
Click to enlarge photos

The ArtGravers & AirGraver tools are a culmination of 45 years of engraving and tool making by Frank and Steve Lindsay.  In 1975, at the age of 17, Steve began to learn hand engraving with his father who is a watchmaker and jeweler.  Frank became friends with John Rohner and James (Bruce) Meeks. At that time he purchased John Rohner's invention called a Gravermeister from John in Boulder Colorado. John's invention was the world's first pneumatic engraver.  John Rohner was a supporter encouraging Steve to continue learning.  Above is a book John signed in 1977 which was an inspiration to Steve.

In 1977, after graduating from high school, Steve enrolled in the same Nebraska tech college that his father attended studying watch making.  Steve enrolled in machine tool and die on the recommendation of John Rohner.  The college and super instructors (i.e. Alan Carter) allowed students to use the school's machine shop for personal projects in the evening. Taking that opportunity, Steve created several new hand pieces for the Gravermeister that he was using. The new hand pieces were palm-sized rather than long. This was beneficial for smaller, detailed engraving as well as providing improved control.  In 1979,  Frank designed an electronic circuit to oscillate and adjust the speed of a solenoid valve. Air was run through the valve to produce blow-pulses rather than suction-pulses. Frank made two of the machines.  Steve used the school's machine tools to build various hand pieces for Frank's adjustable positive pulse generator.  In an interview for the December, 1981 NebraskaLand magazine, Frank's machine was mentioned and a picture of it can be seen on the back corner of the engraving bench on page five of the article. NEBRASKAland.pdf It is the gray box in the right back corner of the bench.  The hand pieces hidden for the article and from the public for years, and until they were posted on the internet in 2006.  At the left is a picture of three positive pulse gravers made in 1979 for Frank's machine. 

Steve found that the limitation to his father's design and other designs on the market be that air or electric is that they depend on a spring in the handpiece. The spring in these designs creates a limited power band. They have an adverse effect of loss of power, or a complete absence of power when the piston floats, caused by the pulses giving insufficient time for the spring to return. This is caused by the frequency of the air or electric pulses being too fast and/or by too much air pressure or current in each pulse. 

Pulse Electromagnet graver
Through the mid and late 90's  Steve worked on designing, and attempting to create a new device that would give an even wider range of power and impact strokes, without sacrificing the finesse and control my father built into his engraving machine. The venture led Steve to research to directly using the solenoid as the handpiece itself using the 555 timer IC circuit from Frank's 555 IC timer pulse generator machine.  The handpiece was an airless electromagnet graver.  The graver worked for the fine engraving, but had limited power at the top end (or if a heavier spring is used be the same loss of low end power occurred similar to the air pulse designs giving the same limited power band).  Problems with the pulse electromagnet engraver were -- The handpiece becomes hot in your hand. The heavier the engraving done the hotter it gets. Another problem was magnetism. Watches and magnets do not get a long. Steve's father is a watchmaker/jeweler and Steve was taught that magnets have no place in a watch-making shop. Since the graver was an electromagnet it would magnetize gravers, especially HSS and M42 gravers, as well as other tools it got near it magnetized. 

Finally, by accident, Steve happened on the current ArtGraver design. The design Steve was attempting to build then was a two valve system working together as one in a forward direction, but he found the mechanism ran better backwards. The challenging aspect was to create an impact pulseless engraver that did not require either an air pulse or an electric pulse generator taking up space on the bench, and that would oscillate with the softest whisper of air required for microscopic engraving shading work and yet be able to muscle out the background around a scroll design when used with much greater air pressure. Since 1999 the ArtGraver has been working for Steve's work as well as engravers and jewelers world wide.

After machine tool & die school in 1979, Steve continued to engrave by day while working second shift in the tool room of a Nebraska manufacturer. After regular hours there, he used their machine tools and continued to refine engraving tools. He also made two positioning vises for his father and himself for engraving under.  The diamond microscopes Frank used in his  jewelry store.  In 1980 after the tools were refined and efficient, Steve quit the factory machine tool job and began full time engraving. Another friend of Frank's, Lynton McKenzie, recommended Steve attend the knife makers' guild show in Kansas City in 1980.  He took the top side of this linked 9mm Browning to the show. Lynton was at the show and took him from table to table to introduce him to knife makers and his collectors. Knife markers such as Buster Warenski, Steve Johnson, Steve Hoel, Ron Lake, Jim Hardenbrook and Jim Ence were at the show.  From those introductions, knife makers and collectors gave Steve engraving jobs. (some can be seen at www.LindsayEngraving.com ). For the next few years, Frank made more improved hand pieces with his lathes and milling machines that Steve then used for his engravings.  In 1984 or 1985 James Meeks came by to say hello and visit.  He was working on his second book then and brought along many white plastic plates. He explained the surface was white but when cut into, the lines showed black. He had engraved them with various scrolls and example designs. He explained he was engraving this plastic because the engraving would photograph well for the book. After that visit Don Glaser Sr. called and said that Meeks really enjoyed seeing my palm sized powered graver. It was an awkward phone call because Steve did not show Meeks his hand piece during his visit.  Steve did receive a phone call while Meeks was visiting and he was left alone at the bench for a short time.  He must have found the hand piece.  It was interesting because after that Mr. Glaser brought out a new smaller hand piece that had a plastic mushroom handle on the butt, unlike the hand pieces they were making that were long and straight with a  handle midway rather than at the end.  It did not matter since Steve was not in the tool business at that time, but only engraving for collectors.  In 1987 Frank and Steve did some engraving projects together. They produced five engraved folding knives. Steve drew the outlines of the knife designs and Frank made and set the diamonds, and Steve then engraved them.  Frank's knives had hidden watch screws and wedges and would come apart allowing the inside surfaces as well as the outside ones to be engraved.  The five pieces were called Lindsay-Lindsay. The Japanese knife engraving market was strong then and several of them went to customers and dealers in Japan selling for as much as $40,000.  Later the owner of the #5 piece contacted Steve with the news that he had a terminal illness and wanted to sell and was asking $110,000. It was offered for sale on the LindsayEngraving.comsite and was resold.

Lynton Mckenzie and Steve engraved a SCI  Safari Club International rifle project together.  David Miller was the maker, Lynton engraved the rifle and Steve did the accessories and a Steve Hoel folding knife that were cased with the rifle.   The piece sold at auction for $210,000.   There is a photo of the accessories at link. Click the photo there to enlarge, link.

Lynton had also  been engraving Gene Clark's watches.  When Lynton became sick in early 1998 he recommended to Gene that Steve engrave them.  Steve engraved three of Gene's watches.  An improved ArtGraver design was completed while working on the second one. That second one was auctioned at Sotherby's and sold for $62,500.   LindSayengraving.com/Clark.htmThrough the years the ArtGraver continued to be improved.  There is a video of one of Gene's watch faces being engraved in the above link.


Various ArtGraver designs.  


1. The self oscillation pulsefree ArtGraver piston principle was patented. It can operate with very little air pressure or air volume. In fact, by simply blowing in it.  Even attached to a toy balloon, the tool will idle. Instead of a spring for the return or impact stroke, the device uses air pressure for both directions. As a result, the piston always stays balanced and low or high air pressures can be used without one side overpowering the other causing the piston to float, which can occur with the spring-pulse designs. The patented idle of the new design prevents jumps that sometimes occur with spring-pulse designs. The stroke length and speed adjustment is in the bore of tool. Adjustment is made by removing the graver and adjusting the screw at the bottom of the tool hole.


2. A multiple controller box is shown above. Since this box required a lot of work to manufacture, it was replaced by using either a simple toggle-routing valve on the current foot controller setup, or quick disconnects. This development allows as many hand pieces and rotaries as needed to be operated at the same time.


3. One way to move the length-of-stroke adjustment to the outside of the hand piece was the ring pictured above. Only one of these was made as a prototype and it was patented when the snap on/off handle was patented. The tool worked nicely, but it was difficult to make and assemble because of all the small internal parts.


4. In the design shown above, stroke adjustment was still in the tool hole, but the addition of the black rings around the body made it possible to adjust the exhaust by turning the ring. When a stroke adjustment was made, the exhaust could also be tuned to make them run even better.
The stroke adjustment on the tools makes one hand piece as versatile as a variety of different-sized hand pieces.


5. Away to adjust the stroke by moving the nose in and out with a ring around the body, while simultaneously adjusting (tuning) the exhaust was an additional patent. Synchronizing the two made the tool run well throughout the stroke range, without having to adjust one and then the other. The ring works in a manner similar to focusing a lens on a camera. Because of the way the nose is held in place, the impacts are isolated to the nose and graver shank. This leads to less vibration to the body during impacting, and provides significantly more power when needed.   The stroke adjustment is similar to gears in a car and makes the tool perform like numerous handpieces in one. First gear is good for shading and fifth gear is good for background. If thinking about it this way, the old pulse machines similar to my father's machine has one gear.


6. The development of the PalmControl meant the elimination of the foot pedal. I noticed that while engraving with a foot pedal, engravers also vary the pressure used to hold the graver point in a cut. Depending on the depth, engravers vary the amount of palm pressure. This idea was built upon by making a handle that would automatically respond to the palm pressure to operate the throttle. The concept for the PalmControl was: why do we have to duplicate with a foot pedal what our hand is already doing? It was also patented. The legal enforceable claims of the patent protect a hand push pressure activated power tool used in the hand engraving and jewelry fields.

Link to the PalmControl ArtGraver page

 

Sours: https://fractalvise.com/history.htm

Engravers pneumatic hand

An ultra sensitive pneumatic impact Hand Engraving Tool for Engravers, Jewelers and Artists. 

new.gif (1389 bytes)The OMEGA, a larger version of the Air Chasing Graver will be ready to ship soon.

Designed and made by an engraver/jeweler/toolmaker who has been building his own engraving tools for 23 years.  The Air Chasing Graver is a precision instrument, designed for unsurpassed hand engraving and impact control.

A  unique feature of the tool is the lack of an internal spring found in other engraving impact tools.  This lack of an internal spring means a much wider power range (.05 PSI through 50 PSI).

Features:
Same size as a traditional palm push graver

Impacts per minute may be adjusted from 2,520 to an incredible 24,500

Length of stroke can be set from  just a few thousands to 3/8 of an inch

User-adjustable, three position comfort choice for tubing attachment

The recently released Air Chasing Graver is the smallest and most customizable hand engraving impact tool available.

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Stainless construction

Adjustable idle

Walnut handle with a Lindsay banknote style engraving  inset

Hardened piston

Accepts gravers or  points with  shanks fitting a .133"dia tool hole

View computer videos of the Air Chasing Graver at work, filmed through a microscope.

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(Left) Air Chasing Graver.  (Right) 1"x 3/4" steel engraving with gold inlays using the Air Chasing Graver. (click for close-up)

The Air Chasing Graver is the smallest hand engraving impact tool on the market, ideally suited for fine exhibition grade engraving.  The tool is similar in size and feel to traditional non-powered hand gravers.   

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Air Chasing Graver pictured next to a traditional palm push graver.

The Air Chasing Graver will idle and oscillate with as little as 1/20th of a pound of air (equivalent to the air pressure in a toy balloon), to provide the finestmicroscopic engraving shading cuts.  At the opposite extreme, the Air Chasing Graver can use up to 50 PSI, to become a powerful metal cutting tool for deep engraving projects, and to aid the jeweler or artist with hammering control.  Length of stroke and impacts per minute are fully adjustable via an adjusting mechanism in the handpiece. Impacts per minute range from 2,520 to an incredible 24,500 (this is 20,500 impacts faster than most other engraving impact tools).   This allows the user to set up the tool in accordance with his own unique preferences and to the type of engraving being executed.  Each one of these tools is produced by Steve Lindsay.  They are not mass produced but are made individually, with the personal attention to quality, materials and fit that Steve Lindsay gives to all the tools he makes for his own engraving work.  


The Air Chasing Graver can also be used for stippling as on this knife bolster.  A point of needle sharpness is used, and the idle adjustment set so that the tool is impacting continuously.  The point is held loosely on the surface of the work as the tool impacts.  Many dots can be placed in a short time. For the 24k gold inlay, the Air Chasing Graver was first used with a square graver to outline the butterfly, and then a flat graver was used to cut out the pocket.  Next an onglette was used to under cut the pocket.  Then, 24k gold sheet of .015" thickness was cut out in the shape of the butterfly and a 1/8" round brass punch was inserted into the Air Chasing Graver and used to hammer the gold into the pocket. (The hammering expands the gold, forcing it into the undercuts in the pocket holding the gold in place).  The gold was then block sanded down flush, starting with 400 grit paper and working up to 2000 grit.  The final step was stipple engraving, carried out using the Air Chasing Graver.  See more photos of the piece.osborne03 copya thumb1x1.jpg (20672 bytes)

This hand engraving tool is operated and controlled with a pressure regulator, foot control valve, needle valve, and a port adjustment mechanism,contained in the handpiece, that controls length and speed of stroke.  Users supply an air compressor.  Because the porting is well balanced, air consumption is efficient.  When the tool is idling or impacting delicately the tool uses just .022 CFM (cubic feet per minute).  To put this small amount into perspective, it would take approximately ten minutes to fill a 10"x11" sized plastic sack with air at this rate.  Maximum air consumption can vary depending on the porting adjustment set by the user in the handpiece.  At 50 PSI, with the porting adjustment set to a very fast, short length .020" stroke and with the foot control pushed to the floor, the tool will require .4 CFM.  With the porting adjustment set to the maximum length of stroke of 3/8" the tool will require .875 CFM at the same 50 PSI.  This low air consumption means only a small air compressor is required.  A minimum of 30 PSI is recommended but 10 PSI is more than sufficient for fine engraving.  Steve Lindsay rarely uses over 15 PSI.

The Air Chasing Graver accepts 3/32" square gravers and 1/8" round gravers or other gravers and points with a shank fitting the .133" dia. tool hole.  Three High Speed Steel gravers and one Carbide graver are included with the tool.

No inexpensive aluminum is used in the Air Chasing Graver.  The tool features all stainless construction with a fine finished walnut handle, hardened piston, adjustable idle, and customizablethree position choice for tubing attachment to the handpiece.  Being equal in size to the traditional non powered palm push graver, the Air Graver fits comfortably in the palm of the hand.   The inset in the butt of the handle is a Steve Lindsay banknote style engraving designed for the handpiece and reproduced with a restored 1915 150 ton coining press.   The design was engraved in tool steel, hardened, and used to reproduced itself in the press.  Download and view a microscope video of this actual die being engraved using the Lindsay Air Chasing Graver.

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(Above left) Bottom view revealing a screw for the length and strokes per minute adjustment. (Above right ) Inset banknote style engraving in handle.
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(Above) The tubing attachment may be moved to left rear, right rear or to front center. Above, it has been moved to
front center.  More info. and images of these attachment options

User Feedback about the Air Graver

Ordering Information

A note from Steve J. Lindsay
The evolution of the Air Chasing Graver began 23 years ago.  In 1978 in college I majored in Tool & Die and Mechanical Engineering on the advice given in 1975 by the late Bruce (James) Meeks, author of the book "Art of Engraving".  While there I made handpieces for myself and my father, Frank Lindsay, to replace the one that came with a hand engraving machine my father purchased in 1972 from a co-inventor of that machine. In 1979 my father invented a fully adjustable electronic circuit and valve that produced pulses of air.  Other hand engraving machines currently on the market today work on a similar air pulse principle but use a mechanical rotary valve to produce the pulses.  Both my father and I built numerous handpieces for his electronic valve invention, until he perfected a miniature handpiece that I have been using for most of my 21 years in the engraving profession.  My father talked about marketing his invention back then, but he decided not to - he wanted to give me an edge over the competition in my engraving career.

I have found that the limitation to my father's design and other designs on the market is that they depend on a spring for either the return or power stroke.  The spring in these designs creates a limited power band.  They have an adverse effect of loss of power, or a complete absence of power when the piston floats, caused by the air pulses giving insufficient time for the spring to return.  This is caused by the frequency of the air pulses being too fast and/or by too much air pressure in each pulse.  For the past 6 years, I have been drawing, designing, and attempting to create a new device that would give an even wider range of power and impact strokes, without sacrificing the finesse and control my father built into his engraving machine.  The venture led me to research electronic solenoid engraving handpieces using 555 timer IC circuits.  These worked for the fine engraving, but did not have much power at the top end and also produced too much heat.  Then there are the drawers full of pneumatic devices and handpieces including self-oscillating handpieces using a spring for either the return or impact stroke.  I found these designs had a limited power band, vibrated excessively, and were hard to start without an extra surge of air pressure.  Finally, by accident, I happened on this design.   The design I was attempting to build was a two valve system working together as one in a forward direction, but I found the mechanism ran better backwards.  The challenging aspect was to create an impact device that would pulsate with the softest whisper of air required for microscopic engraving shading work and yet be able to muscle out the background around a scroll design when used with much greater air pressure.  This tool has been working well for my engraving and for a few fellow engraver testers.  As more of these tools get out into jewelers' and engravers' hands I am looking forward to more feedback about them.

Background and Advantage of the Air Chasing Graver
The traditional tool for hand engraving and stone setting - and one still widely used - is the palm push graver tool.  This traditional hand engraving tool consists of the working point or graver, set into a wood handle that fits into the palm of the hand. 

A problem that arises with this traditional tool, even in very fine engraving cuts, is that when the graver is pushed through a cut, a loss of control is experienced due to the force exerted.  The graver point will tend to stick and slip through the cut leaving an uneven incision.  Even the best jewelers and engravers have this problem when using a palm push engraver.  Beginners will have even greater difficulty, and in some cases the slipping can cause extensive damage to the work.  Engraving with a power impact engraving tool can eliminate this problem.  No longer do you need to "push", but let the impacts of the piston drive the tool through the cut.   In fact, while engraving with an impact tool you should not push at all, but just hold the tool in the cut and concentrate on guiding or steering the graver.

Palm pushing, even with fine cuts, will still result in the sticking and slipping problem.  An advantage of Frank Lindsay's machine, and now the Air Chasing Graver, is using power for the finest cuts rather than palm pushing.  Even when shading fine lines in something as soft as 24k gold, ivory or pearl, the use of power will result in more control and confidence than palm pushing.  For example, the pearl in this and this knife handle, were engraved with the Air Chasing Graver set for extremely fine impacts.  Pearl is similar to the consistency and hardness of a fingernail and is easily cut by palm pushing but, because the sticking and slipping problem can leave an uneven cut even in soft materials, the handpiece was set up to give short, delicate impacts by adjusting the speed and length of stroke mechanism within the Air Chasing Graver.  To help the foot pedal control give a full range of movement, the regulator air supply is lowered 2.5 to 3 PSI.  See the engraving tutorial page for more about this.

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User Feedback about the Air Graver

View a microscope video of the Air Chasing Graver at work.

Ordering Information

new.gif (1389 bytes)The OMEGA, a larger version of the Air Chasing Graver will be ready to ship soon.

hand03 copy1x1.jpg (9997 bytes)

Email:  [email protected]
Web:  www.lindsayengraving.com

Sours: https://www.lindsayengraving.com/engraving-tools-2000/airgraver/index.html
Making a Pneumatic Engraver: DIY Hand Engraver

Pneumatic Hand Engraving

Ever wonder just how do they do that? Well sign up and learn! This workshop takes true beginner engravers through all the first steps needed to understand hand engraving. We will also touch on the history of this intricate art, explaining hand techniques of yesterday and today.

Engraving was traditionally done by hand pushing a graver through the metal. The conventional "hand push" process is still practiced today, but modern technology has brought us mechanically air-assisted engraving systems. These types of pneumatic systems provide the raw power to move the graver through the metal, but do not guide or control the design. Some of the major benefits of using a pneumatic system are the reduction of fatigue, the ability to work with much harder metals, and a shortening of the learning curve.

Note:Each student will have their own pneumatic system to use during class, with the opportunity to purchase at a great price at the end. Also, class size is limited to 10 students.

The course will teach the basics of tool making, graver sharpening, layout, scroll design, theory of hand lettering, and of course, hand engraving using modern pneumatic methods. Other more advanced concepts, such as background removal and gold inlay, will be demonstrated. Additional demos will be tailored to the interests of participants and covered as time allows.

Students will have the chance to engrave on steel, copper and brass during the course. After practicing on a series of samples, participants can focus on a final project of their own design, a steel pendant or dog tag. The class is intended for beginners and all concepts will be explained from the beginning.

If you'd like to see more of Tira's work, please visit her website TiraMitchell.com.

Sours: https://metalwerx.com/class-detail/pneumatic-hand-engraving

Now discussing:

There was still a month and a half before the start of student life, and Sergei invited her, along with his father, to his dacha on. The Black Sea coast. Sanych could not leave the city for a long time because of work, but Tsvetik liked this small villa, and his father left.



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