Ryzen buy

Ryzen buy DEFAULT

The best CPU for gaming in 2021

The best CPU for gaming is actually a component you can buy today. After an extended period where you couldn't buy the processor you might want, it's generally possible to get your pick of the bunch. There have even been actual deals on some of the top CPUs too. Shocking, I know.

Every chip on this list has been tested through our intense CPU benchmarking suite on our PC Gamer test rig. This includes 3D and video rendering workloads as well and, most importantly, gaming performance.  

Right now, our favorite CPU is the Ryzen 9 5900X, along with much of AMD's current impressive Zen 3 chips, which give you the best performance and pricing combined. The release of Intel's Rocket Lake chips means we've got a bunch of CPUs of varying quality, with its flagship Core i9 11900K being a bit of an expensive letdown whereas the less powerful Core i5 11600K is the best value we've seen for Intel CPUs. But we've got another new generation of Intel chips on the way, with Alder Lake potentially capable of shaking off AMD's grip on the high end of the best CPU list.

Make sure you check ourbest gaming motherboard list if you are planning to do a brand new build.

The best CPU for gaming

1. AMD Ryzen 9 5900X

The best CPU for gaming right now

Specifications

Cores: 12

Threads: 24

Base Clock: 3.7 GHz

Boost Clock: 4.8 GHz

Overclocking: Yes

L3 Cache: 64 MB

TDP: 105 W

PCIe 4.0 lanes: 20

Reasons to buy

+The best CPU for gaming+Awesome performance throughout+Fast and efficient architecture

Reasons to avoid

-Needs a proper 3rd-party cooler

AMD's Zen architecture has improved with each generation, but the fact that AMD managed to knock out a 19 percent IPC improvement with Zen 3 is nothing short of staggering. The key takeaway for us as gamers is that this improvement means that AMD can now stand toe to toe with Intel when it comes to gaming. Honestly, there's so little between these two now that anyone claiming otherwise is delusional. 

Whatever resolution you are gaming at, this processor can handle it and keep your graphics card of choice fed with many juicy frames. The fact that this is a 12-core, 24-thread monster means that it can cope with anything else you throw at it as well. So if you have dreams of 3D rendering, video editing, or any other serious tasks, you'll know that you have the raw grunt to handle it. The fact that it won't hold you back when gaming makes it even sweeter. 

The only real downside is the pricing and the dropping of the Wraith cooler—don't forget to factor in when you buy. You do get what you pay for, though, and this is a phenomenal chip for gaming and anything else you might want to do. 

If you're in the market for absolute power, you could step up to the Ryzen 9 5950X, which gives you 16 cores and 32 threads. However, it costs $250 more, and for gaming purposes and even most content creation chores, the 5900X is more than sufficient.

Read our full AMD Ryzen 9 5900X review.

2. Intel Core i5 11600K

Intel's best gaming CPU is a great value proposition

Specifications

Cores: 6

Threads: 12

Base clock: 3.9 GHz

Turbo clock: 4.9 GHz (single core)

Overclocking: Yes, 4.9 GHz typical all-core

L3 cache: 12 MB

TDP: 125 W

PCIe 4.0 lanes: 20

Reasons to buy

+Undercuts 5600X on price+High-end gaming performance+Solid multithreading chops

Reasons to avoid

-iGPU is still quite weak

The Core i5 11600K is my favorite chip of the new Rocket Lake generation, which marks a nostalgic return to the old days of Intel CPU launches. The top processor was always a decent halo product, but the i5 was where the price/performance metrics really sold a new generation. Okay, with the 11900K being a frustrating chip, maybe it's not a total return to the old days, but the 11600K is still an outstanding six-core, 12-thread gaming processor.

It's also incredibly affordable too, with a price tag well underneath the Ryzen 5 5600X and performance figures that have it trading blows with AMD's otherwise excellent Zen 3 chip. The Cypress Cove 14nm backport may have made it relatively power-hungry, but that doesn't stop it from being a great gaming CPU and one that delivers a lot of processor silicon for not a lot of cash.

And PCIe 4.0 support on Intel 500-series motherboards. Though that is of dubious benefit at the moment as our testing has not so far gone well with supported PCIe 4.0 SSDs. That will hopefully change, but even so, this is still one of the best cheap gaming CPUs around.

Read our full Intel Core i5 11600K review.

3. AMD Ryzen 5 5600X

AMD's top affordable, and available, Zen 3 CPU today

Specifications

Cores: 6

Threads: 12

Base Clock: 3.7 GHz

Boost Clock: 4.6 GHz

Overclocking: Yes

L3 Cache: 32 MB

TDP: 65 W

PCIe 4.0 lanes: 20

Reasons to buy

+Awesome gaming performance+Great value for money+Decent overclocking potential+Wraith Stealth included

Reasons to avoid

-$50 more than 3600X-... 3600X came with a better cooler

When it comes to gaming, everything that's great about the 5900X rings true for this more affordable Zen 3 chip as well. There's nothing between any of the Ryzen 5000 chips in games, which means you'll hit the same frame rates with this chip as you will our number one pick. Which is incredible when you think about it—top-tier performance from the most affordable Zen 3 CPU? We'll say yes to that every single day.

This does have half the core count of that top chip, rolling in as it does with six cores and 12 threads. However, this is only an issue with those more serious workloads, which is more than sufficient for more reasonable stuff. You could argue that gaming could go beyond the 12-threads we have here, but there's no evidence that is the case so far, and that's even though the next-gen consoles are rocking 8-cores and 16-threads. 

The Ryzen 5 5600X also bucks the Ryzen 5000 family's trend by shipping with a Wraith Stealth cooler, so you don't have to drop extra money on a third-party chiller. You don't need to, but if you do, you'll hit higher clocks for longer and also open up the wonderful world of overclocking, which could make it worthwhile. This is a decent little overclocker, and while it won't affect gaming much, it'll help in other areas nicely.

Read our full AMD Ryzen 5 5600X review.

4. Intel Core i5 10400F

A great budget-friendly option for Intel builds

Specifications

Cores: 6

Threads: 12

Base Clock: 2.9 GHz

Turbo Clock: 4.3 GHz

Overclocking: No

L3 Cache: 12 MB

TDP: 65 W

PCIe 3.0 lanes: 16

Reasons to buy

+Affordable mid-range performance+Cooler included in box

Reasons to avoid

-Doesn't support overclocking

The Core i5 10400F is a surprisingly exciting option. It's slightly faster than the previous-gen Core i5 9400, but that F-suffix means it ditches the Intel integrated graphics completely. That's not a problem for gamers unless you want to use QuickSync, although Nvidia's NVENC is arguably better anyway. Overall, it's an excellent budget-friendly choice that doesn't cost much more than a Core i3 part.

There are other compromises, like the locked multiplier—no overclocking here. But you can save money and grab an H470 motherboard. At least you get a cooler in the box, something we'd like to see as an option with every CPU. Most boards will happily run the 10400F at 3.9GHz, so don't worry about the low base clock.

While the i5 10400F may not be as fast as other CPUs in multithreaded tests, in our gaming suite, it's tied with AMD's last-gen 3900X. Future games may start to push beyond its 6-core capabilities, but probably not before you're ready for an upgrade. Right now, the i5 10400F is plenty fast and extremely affordable.

5. AMD Ryzen 7 5800X

A great mid-range chip for serious work and gaming

Specifications

Cores: 8

Threads: 16

Base Clock: 3.8 GHz

Boost Clock: 4.7 GHz

Overclocking: Yes

L3 Cache: 32 MB

TDP: 105 W

PCIe 4.0 lanes: 20

Reasons to buy

+The same great Zen 3 architecture+Awesome gaming performance+PCIe 4.0 support

Reasons to avoid

-Can fall behind Intel in gaming at this price

If the Intel Core i7 doesn't exist in a world, this would be an incredible chip and would have made it into our top three recommendations, no sweat. It's excellent for gaming, producing the exact figures that can be seen for the 5900X and 5600X. Still, it also appears to hit the sweet spot in configuration terms, with its eight cores and 16 threads surely seeing it right for the future, seeing as that is what the Xbox Series X and Playstation 5 are rocking. 

Unfortunately for AMD, Intel does exist, and the blue company's Core i7 10700K matches this in plenty of the more critical metrics but has this chip beat in one significant way—value for money. This is faster in serious tasks, and if that's what you've got an eye on, then buy this and don't give it a second thought. But if you're mainly looking at gaming, Intel does pretty much the same but costs less. And that's hard for AMD to get away from. 

Competition aside, this is still Zen 3 strutting its stuff, and it does that impressively well. Throw in the support for PCIe 4.0 as well, and this is a forward-looking chip that will last you for years. 

Read the full AMD Ryzen 5 5800X review.

6. Intel Core i9 10900K

The Comet Lake flagship is still a powerful option

Specifications

Cores: 10

Threads: 20

Base Clock: 3.7 GHz

Turbo Clock: 5.3 GHz

Overclocking: Yes, 5.0-5.3 GHz typical

L3 Cache: 20 MB

TDP: 95 W

PCIe 3.0 lanes: 16

Reasons to buy

+High performance gaming+Overclocking potential

Reasons to avoid

-Older Comet Lake architecture

Intel's top Comet Lake gaming chip, the Core i9 10900K, lost a lot of what made it special with the release of Zen 3. When the 10900K was unveiled, it came with the reassurance that it was the world's fastest gaming processor, but that's not a claim it can hold on to anymore, with plenty of games handing wins to AMD's Ryzen 5900X. It's still a cracking gaming chip, don't get us wrong, but it traded on being the very best, and once that went, it lost a lot of its shine.

What hasn't overshadowed it is Intel's latest release. The Rocket Lake i9 11900K is almost as powerful overall, but it's more expensive and still misses out on the multi-threaded side.

The 10900K is still overkilled for most cases, apart from possibly at the very high-end and for serious workloads; AMD chips make more sense, but there's still a bizarre charm to this CPU. You probably don't need it, but if you build a machine around it, you know it won't be this chip that's holding you back.

The Core i9 10900K is the first time Intel has squeezed ten processing cores into its mainstream lineup. Given it's capable of hitting 5.3GHz (however briefly), it represents an impressive outing for the 14nm technology Intel has been tied to for so long. Gaming still benefits from high clock speeds, which still delivers; it doesn't make much sense given the competition.

You'll need to invest in a Z490 motherboard to go along with this chip and some serious cooling (a decent PSU wouldn't go amiss either). Don't be fooled by that reasonable 95W TDP, as it'll push way beyond that, especially if you're thinking of exploring its overclocking chops. 

Read the full Intel Core i9 10900K review.

7. AMD Ryzen 7 5700G

The best chip with integrated graphics

Specifications

Cores: 8

Threads: 16

Base Clock: 3.8 GHz

Turbo Clock: 4.6 GHz

Overclocking: Yes, 5.0-5.3 GHz typical

L3 Cache: 16 MB

TDP: 65 W

PCIe 3.0 lanes: 16

Reasons to buy

+The best Integrated GPU+Excellent thermals and power consumption+Strong all round performance

Reasons to avoid

-Lacks PCIe 4.0-Needs fast memory to be at its best-Expensive for an APU

AMD's APUs are the best processors to drop into your rig if you're not going to use a discrete graphics card, but still want a modicum of gaming performance out of your system. And the AMD Ryzen 7 5700G is the best of the latest Zen 3 based chips to deliver that.
Unlike previous APU offerings from AMD, the Ryzen 7 5700G is far more of a jack-of-all-trades chip because we are talking about an eight-core Zen 3 CPU component with 16 threads and a powerful Vega-based GPU to back it up. That makes this a chip that's almost up there with the best of the Ryzen 5000-series CPUs in processing power, but with the graphical grunt to deliver 1080p gaming on low settings in some seriously demanding titles.

In a GPU drought, that makes the 5700G a tantalizing APU as it will get your new gaming PC up and running. At the same time, you wait for discrete graphics cards to be available and without compromising too heavily on your system performance in the meantime.

The issue is that, as the 5700G is a monolithic design rather than chiplet, there are some performance differences compared to the standard Ryzen 7 5800X, a straight eight-core, 16-thread CPU without graphics. It also lacks PCIe 4.0 support to run the fastest SSDs and demands high-speed memory to make the most of its GPU power. But it's still an excellent all-around AMD processor and a handy option when graphics cards are still so rare.

Read our complete AMD Ryzen 7 5700G review.

Best gaming PC | Best gaming keyboard | Best gaming mouse
Best gaming chair | Best VR headset | Best graphics cards 

The best CPU for gaming FAQ

How do you test CPUs?

While gaming resolutions run from 720p to 4K, we largely test at 1080p. This will show the most significant difference in gaming performance you're likely to see and pushes the CPU into the spotlight instead of the GPU—an Nvidia GeForce RTX 2080 Ti, in our case.

We've also used high-end G.Skill Trident Z and Flare X DDR4-3200 CL14 memory on all modern platforms, in either 2x 8GB or 4x 8GB configurations. Again, this is to eliminate any potential bottlenecks and let the CPUs reach their maximum performance. Liquid cooling was used on all CPUs, though for stock performance, we saw zero difference between that and the box coolers on those parts that included cooling.

The motherboards used in testing include the MSI MEG Z390 Godlike for Intel LGA1151, MSI MEG X570 Godlike, and Gigabyte X570 Aorus Master for third-gen Ryzen and MSI X470 Gaming M7 for first and second-gen Ryzen CPUs. AMD's APUs were tested on an MSI B350I Pro AC motherboard, as we needed something with video ports. For the HEDT platforms (not that we recommend those any longer for gaming purposes—or most other tasks), we used an Asus X299 Extreme Encore for Intel LGA2066, Asus ROG Zenith Extreme for TR4, and Zenith II Extreme for TRX40.

AMD CPU reviews:

Intel CPU reviews:

What motherboard is right for my CPU?

The latest AMD Ryzen 5000 CPUs still use the AM4 socket and are only compatible with X570, B550, and A520 motherboards (oh, and B450 and X470 motherboards). 

Whereas Intel's Comet Lake chips use the LGA 1200 socket, Rocket Lake has introduced new 500-series boards. Unless you're desperate for the still slightly awkward Intel PCIe 4.0 solution which the latest Intel chips offer, go with either a Z490 or cheaper B460 motherboard at this point for Intel. 

Is Intel or AMD better?

This is a rather loaded question. Right now, the consensus is that AMD has superior CPU technology, with its chiplet design allowing it to produce processors with far higher core counts at prices and thermal levels that Intel cannot match.

However, Intel has historically been better for gaming workloads, with an all-important advantage in single-core performance and instructions-per-clock (IPC). That has slowly been eroded by AMD's subsequent Zen architectures, to the point where there is little difference between them in gaming terms.

The other point to make is that most games are GPU-limited, which means the graphics card is the limiting factor in terms of performance, and you would likely see the same essential frame rates with either CPU manufacturer when a discrete graphics card is used.

Should I overclock my CPU?

The honest answer is: no. Overclocking your processor is not necessarily the risky move it once was, but equally, the benefits of doing so have drastically dropped in recent times. When we're talking about gaming performance, having a slightly higher clocked CPU can make a bit of a difference, but arguably your graphics card will be the part that limits the speed of your system.

There is also the point that overclocked CPUs create more heat, require more intensive and expensive cooling solutions, need those coolers to work harder, and are, therefore, often louder.

For us, overclocking your CPU to gain real-world performance benefits is not something we'd recommend most PC gamers do.

Jargon buster

Caching - A small segment of high-speed memory dedicated to storing and executing frequently used commands/instructions to speed up software execution. CPUs contain caches designated as Level 1, 2, and 3, with L1 being the fastest and smallest and L3 being the slowest and largest.

Core - Modern CPUs can contain anywhere from two to 70+ cores (in supercomputers), though CPUs housed in most consumer machines will generally carry between four and eight, with AMD's latest CPUs sporting up to 16 cores.

Clock speed - The speed at which a CPU can execute instructions, measured in hertz. A processor with a 3.7 GHz clock speed can process 3.7 billion instructions a second. Clock speed is one of the most critical factors for determining performance in games and workload functions.

Heat sink - A cooling solution for PCs that utilize fans or liquid cooling (active) or aluminum radiators (passive) that rely on convection to regulate a component's temperature.

Hyper-Threading (SMT) - Intel terminology for a tech that allows a processor to handle two sets of instructions 'threads' simultaneously. AMD and other CPU vendors call this SMT, Simultaneous Multi-Threading.

Socket type LGA (Land Grid Array), PGA (Pin Grid Array), or BGA (Ball Grid Array) - The way a CPU interfaces with the socket on a motherboard. LGA is used on Intel sockets with pins as part of the socket. AMD's AM4 solution, PGA, has the processors' pins, which fit into holes on the socket. AMD's Threadripper CPUs also use LGA sockets. A BGA socket is when the processor is permanently soldered to the motherboard, typically on a laptop.

TDP - Thermal design power, the maximum amount of heat a system or chip can produce that the attendant cooling system is designed to deal with under workload. This term can apply to PCs as a whole, GPUs, CPUs, or nearly any other performance component that generates heat and is in large part an indicator of how much power a part draws.

Thread - A thread refers to a series of CPU instructions for a specific program. Older CPUs and SMT disabled run one thread per core, but most modern AMD and Intel CPUs can simultaneously run two threads, sharing some resources (e.g., cache). 

Turbo Boost - Intel technology that allows processors to run at higher clock speeds under demanding loads. AMD also supports turbo or boost clocks, and we use the terms interchangeably regardless of CPU vendor.

Alan has been writing about PC tech since before 3D graphics cards existed, and still vividly recalls having to fight with MS-DOS just to get games to load. He fondly remembers the killer combo of a Matrox Millenium and 3dfx Voodoo, and seeing Lara Croft in 3D for the first time. He's very glad hardware has advanced as much as it has though, and is particularly happy when putting the latest M.2 NVMe SSDs, AMD processors, and laptops through their paces. He has a long-lasting Magic: The Gathering obsession but limits this to MTG Arena these days.

Sours: https://www.pcgamer.com/best-cpu-for-gaming/

Best CPU for Gaming in 2021

When shopping for the best gaming CPU, you'll want to balance performance and features with your PC budget. Our tips and picks below will help you choose the best CPU for gaming. You can also see how all of these processors stack up in our CPU Benchmarks Hierarchy. But for detailed help on picking the best processor for your gaming rig, you can check out our 2021 CPU Buying Guide. And if you're on the fence about which CPU company to go with, our AMD vs. Intel feature dives deep and comes up with a winner.

AMD's Ryzen 7 5700G and Ryzen 5 5600G APUs came to market recently, shaking up the entry-level graphics scene. We found that the duo has the fastest integrated GPU on the market, offering nearly twice the performance of Intel's integrated graphics. The Ryzen 5000G series is now the uncontested champ for extreme budget gaming, small form factor, and HTPC rigs. The 5000G could also slot in as a temporary solution for enthusiasts that can't find a graphics card at reasonable pricing during these times of severe graphics cards shortages.

However, the Ryzen 5 5600G, which now joins our list of Best CPUs for Gaming, is the best pick for that task. The $259 Ryzen 5 5600G's iGPU performance lands within 4% of the $359 Ryzen 7 5700G but for 30% less cash, making it the best value APU for gaming on the market. We also recently tested the Ryzen 3 5300G, but that chip remains OEM-exclusive, meaning that you can't buy it at retail. 

At launch, AMD's Zen 3-powered Ryzen 5000 processors took the lead as the fastest gaming CPUs on the market, but Intel's Rocket Lake chips tightened the race and actually took the lead in the mid-range, as you can see with the Core i5-11400.

Our AMD Zen 3 Ryzen 5000 article has all the details on AMD's new CPUs, but you can check our full lineup of detailed reviews of each model, like the Ryzen 9 5950X and Ryzen 9 5900X, Ryzen 7 5800X, and Ryzen 5 5600X for the detailed rundown.

Intel's Rocket Lake processors have arrived, too, as you can see in our Core i9-11900K and Core i5-11600K, Core i5-11400 and Core i7-11700K reviews. Rocket Lake comes with Intel's first new architecture in the last six years, albeit with the caveat that the company still uses the 14nm process, and the chips top out at eight cores. 

Intel has its Alder Lake processors waiting in the wings for later this year, portending even bigger shakeups to our list of best CPUs for gaming, especially given the extremely promising early test results we've seen crop up.

AMD also has its new CPUs with 3D V-Cache headed to production later this year. Those chips will bring up to 15% more gaming performance courtesy of up to an almost-unthinkable 192MB of L3 cache bolted onto a souped-up Zen 3 processor. So as you can imagine, it won't be long before we have the full scoop on performance.  

Best CPUs for Gaming at a glance (more info below):

Overall Best CPU for Gaming:
AMD Ryzen 5 5600X
Alternate: Intel Core i5-11600K

High Performance Value Best CPU for Gaming:
AMD Ryzen 9 5950X
Alternate: AMD Ryzen 7 5800X

Overall Value Best CPU for Gaming:
AMD Ryzen 9 5900X

Mid-Range Best CPU for Gaming:
Intel Core i5-11400

Budget Best CPU for Gaming:
AMD Ryzen 3 3300X

Entry-Level Best CPU for Gaming:

AMD Ryzen 5 5600G

Choosing the Best Gaming CPU for You

For a list of all processors by performance, check out our CPU Benchmarks Hierarchy for CPU comparisons backed by processor benchmarks. We also maintain a list of best CPUs for workstations, for those who frequently tackle high-end content creation, or other tasks that benefit from high core counts. Higher-end chips benefit the most from the best thermal paste, so check out our guide if you're shopping for a new processor. But if you're after the best gaming CPU, you're in the right place.

If your main goal is gaming, you of course can't forget about the graphics card. Getting the best possible gaming CPU won't help you much if your GPU is under-powered and/or out of date. So be sure to check out Best Graphics Cards page, as well as our GPU Benchmarks Hierarchy to make sure you have the right card for the level of gaming you're looking to achieve.      

CPU Gaming Benchmarks

Image 1 of 8
Image 2 of 8
Image 3 of 8
Image 4 of 8
Image 5 of 8
Image 6 of 8
Image 7 of 8
Image 8 of 8

We rank all the Intel and AMD processors based on our in-depth CPU benchmarks. You can see some of those numbers in the charts above, including overclocked performance results (marked as PBO for AMD processors). 

This group of results comprises only the chips that have passed through our newest test suite, while the tables in our CPU benchmark hierarchy include rankings based on past CPU benchmarks, and also include breakdowns of single- and multi-threaded performance across a broad spate of processors. Finally, the pricing in the charts above represents MSRPs. Given the current state of chip shortages, you likely won't find many of these chips at these prices at retail.

Quick Shopping Tips

When choosing a CPU in 2021, consider the following:

  • You can't lose with AMD or Intel: We recently pointed out that AMD makes better CPUs overall these days in our AMD vs. Intel feature. But so long as you’re considering current-generation parts, the performance debate is basically a wash, particularly when it comes to gaming. Some of the most-expensive mainstream Intel processors do slightly better on gaming, and AMD handles tasks like video editing quicker (thanks largely to extra cores and threads). 
  • For gaming, clock speed is more important than the number of cores: Higher CPU clock speeds translate to snappier performance in simple, common tasks such as gaming, while more cores will help you get through time-consuming workloads faster. In the end, the fastest CPUs of any family of processors have the highest clock speeds. 
  • Budget for a full system: Don't pair a strong CPU with weak storage, RAM and graphics.
  • Overclocking isn’t for everyone: If you want to just get to gaming, it might make more sense to spend $20-$60 more and buy a higher-end chip, rather than spending money on a higher-end cooler.

Best Gaming CPUs for 2021

1. AMD Ryzen 5 5600X

Overall Best CPU for Gaming

Specifications

Architecture: Zen 3

Socket: AM4

Cores/Threads: 6 / 12

Base Frequency: 4.1GHz

Top Boost Frequency: 4.8GHz

TDP: 65W

Reasons to buy

+Strong gaming performance+Strong in single- and multi-threaded workloads+Relatively easy to cool+PCIe 4.0+Bundled cooler+Power efficiency+Works with existing 500-series motherboards

Reasons to avoid

-Higher gen-on-gen pricing

The AMD Ryzen 5 5600X takes the top spot in the gaming PC market with a solid blend of Intel-beating performance in both gaming and application workloads. The six-core 12-thread chip lands at $299, a $50 price hike over its previous-gen counterpart, but brings more than enough extra gaming and application performance to justify the premium. The Ryzen 5 5600X even beats the Intel Core i9-10900K at gaming, which is an incredible feat given its price point. Not to mention that it's the most power-efficient desktop PC processor we've ever tested. 

AMD's Zen 3 microarchitecture results in a stunning 19% increase in IPC, which floats all boats in terms of performance in gaming, single-threaded, and multi-threaded applications. In fact, the chip generally matches the gaming performance of its more expensive sibling, the $449 Ryzen 7 5800X. That makes the 5600X an incredibly well-rounded chip that can handle any type of gaming, from competitive-class performance with high refresh rate monitors to streaming, while also serving up more than enough performance for day-to-day application workloads.    

The Ryzen 5 5600X has a 3.7 GHz base and 4.6 GHz boost clock, but with the right cooling and motherboard, you can expect higher short-term boosts. The chip also has a 65W TDP rating, meaning it runs exceptionally cool and quiet given its capabilities (the previous-gen model was 95W). Existing AMD owners with a 500-series motherboard will breathe a sigh of relief as the 5600X drops right into existing 500-series motherboards. You can also drop the chips right into 400-series motherboards. If you need a new motherboard to support the chip, both 400- and 500-series motherboards are plentiful and relatively affordable, with the B550 lineup offering the best overall value for this class of chip. 

Read: AMD Ryzen 5 5600X Review

Intel Core i5-11600K

Overall Best CPU for Gaming - Alternate Pick

Specifications

Architecture: Rocket Lake

Socket: LGA 1200

Cores/Threads: 6 / 12

Base Frequency: 3.9GHz

Top Boost Frequency: 4.9GHz

TDP: 125W

Reasons to buy

+Competitive price-to-performance ratio+Solid gaming performance+Excellent performance in threaded applications+Snappy single-threaded performance+Overclockable

Reasons to avoid

-No bundled cooler-Comparatively high power consumption

At $270, Intel's speedy Core i5-11600K doesn't claim outright benchmark supremacy over the Ryzen 5 5600X. Still, you probably won't notice the relatively slight differences in gaming when you pair the chip with a mid-range GPU or play at heightened fidelity settings.

The Core i5-11600K is incredibly competitive in both gaming and multi-threaded work and comes with a friendly price tag. Also, keep your eye out for the $237 version, the Core i5-11600KF, which comes without integrated graphics. If you plan to use a discrete GPU, the KF model is your chip, as it is functionally the same as the standard model but comes at an absolute steal at $237. That is if you can't find a Ryzen 5 5600X in stock, of course.

The 11600K boosts to a peak of 4.9 GHz on two cores and can maintain a 4.6 GHz all-core frequency. The chip drops readily into either Z490 or 500-series motherboards and comes with an unlocked multiplier, meaning you are free to overclock. In fact, after tuning, the 11600K matches the Ryzen 5 5600X in gaming. It also supports PCIe 4.0 for the graphics card and a single M.2 slot.

The catch? The 11600K comes with a 125W PL1 (power Limit 1) rating, the same as the previous-gen 10600K, but has a 251W PL2, a whopping 69W increase compared to the previous 182W limit. That means you'll need a capable cooler to deal with the extra heat. Intel's K-series chips don't come with a cooler, so you'll have to budget one in if you pick the 11600K and also be willing to overlook its comparatively high power consumption.

Read: Intel Core i5-11600K Review

2. AMD Ryzen 9 5950X

High Performance Value Best CPU for Gaming

Specifications

Architecture: Zen 3

Socket: AM4

Cores/Threads: 16/32

Base Frequency: 3.4GHz

Top Boost Frequency: 4.9GHz

TDP: 105W

Reasons to buy

+Class-leading 16 cores & 32 threads+Overclockable+Higher boost frequencies+Reasonable price-per-core+Power efficiency+PCIe Gen 4.0

Reasons to avoid

-Requires beefy cooling-No bundled cooler-Higher gen-on-gen pricing-No integrated graphics

High end desktop processors have long offered the ultimate in performance, as long as you were willing to pay the price. Aside from high MSRPs, the chips also require expensive accommodations, like beefy motherboards and the added cost of fully populating quad-channel memory controllers. Add in the inevitable trade-offs, like reduced performance in lightly-threaded applications and games, and any cost-conscious users who could benefit from the threaded horsepower of a HEDT chip just settle for mainstream offerings.

AMD's Ryzen 9 5950X, with 16 cores and 32 threads, expands on its predecessors' mission of bringing HEDT-class performance to mainstream motherboards, lowering the bar for entry. The 5950X carries a $799 price tag, but that’s downright affordable compared to competing HEDT processors that don't offer the same class of performance.

We generally don't recommend HEDT processors for enthusiasts that are only interested in gaming. Gamers are best served by mainstream processors (with fewer cores and higher clocks) that are often faster in games; the Ryzen 9 5950X also falls into the same category - AMD's lesser 5000-series models are a better value for gamers. However, if you're after a chip and platform that can do serious work seriously fast, but still be nimble enough to deliver high-refresh gameplay at the end of the day, the Ryzen 9 5950X fits the bill like no other CPU before it.

Read: AMD Ryzen 9 3950X Review

AMD Ryzen 7 5800X

High Performance Value Best CPU for Gaming - Alternate Pick

Specifications

Architecture: Zen 3

Socket: AM4

Cores/Threads: 8 / 16

Base Frequency: 3.8GHz

Top Boost Frequency: 4.7GHz

TDP: 105W

Reasons to buy

+Strong gaming performance+Solid single- and multi-threaded performance+IPC gain, boost frequencies+Power efficiency+Overclockable+PCIe Gen4 support+400/500-series compatible

Reasons to avoid

-Price-No bundled cooler-No integrated graphics

The Ryzen 7 5800X provides a great blend of both gaming and application performance, but our initial concerns with the chip centered around shortage-induced pricing concerns. The Ryzen 7 5800X has been reliably in stock for nearly a month now and retails for $25 less than the official $450 suggested pricing. That reduction goes a long way to addressing our pricing concerns.

The Ryzen 7 5800X offers the same level of gaming performance as the Ryzen 5 5600X. If gaming is your primary intention, the Ryzen 5 5600X is a much better value and remains our top pick for gaming. However, if you're looking for more of an all-rounder that offers a bit more grunt power for applications, the Ryzen 7 5800X is your chip.

The Ryzen 5 5800X's suggested pricing lands at a $50 premium over the competing 11700K, but it has sold for ~$25 below that mark for the last month, and it's available now. This chip consumes much less power than the 11700K, resulting in more forgiving cooling requirements and the ability to run the chip on less expensive motherboards that don't require the full-fledged power circuitry needed to extract the best performance from the 11700K. Both of these factors reduce the 5800X's overall platform costs. Additionally, you can step up to 12- or 16-core Ryzen 5000 models in the future with 400- and 500-series motherboards.

Read: AMD Ryzen 7 5800X Review

3. AMD Ryzen 9 5900X

Overall Value Best CPU for Gaming

Specifications

Architecture: Zen 3

Socket: AM4

Cores/Threads: 12/24

Base Frequency: 3.7GHz

Top Boost Frequency: 4.8GHz

TDP: 65W

Reasons to buy

+Support for PCIe 4.0+Unlocked multiplier+Compatible with 500-series motherboards+Excellent gaming performance +Excellent single- and multi-threaded performance

Reasons to avoid

-No bundled cooler-Higher gen-on-gen pricing-No integrated graphics

If you’re truly only concerned about the best gaming CPU and basic productivity tasks, you should go with the Ryzen 5 5600X and save yourself some money. But if you’re looking for the uncontested fastest gaming chip on the market, or thinking of getting into game streaming, occasionally edit video, or just like the idea of having more threads available when you need them, AMD’s Ryzen 9 5900X is an incredible value.

The 12-core 24-thread Ryzen 9 5900X is rated for a 3.7 GHz base and 4.8 GHz boost, but we clocked it in at 5.0 GHz during our own testing. The 5900X offers the ultimate in gaming performance - it is the uncontested gaming chip on the market, but it is a bit overkill if gaming is all you do. However, if you feel the need for speed in productivity workloads, this chip's 12 cores will chew through those workloads with aplomb. 

There’s also support for PCIe 4.0 and overclockability to consider. The Ryzen 9 5900X drops into existing 500-series and 400-series motherboards. You'll need to bring your own cooler, and the bigger the better - cooling definitely has an impact on performance with the higher-end Ryzen 5000 processors. However, if you're looking at the no-compromise chip for gaming, this is your chip.

Read:AMD Ryzen 9 5900X Review

4. Intel Core i5-11400

Mid-Range Best CPU for Gaming

Specifications

Architecture: Rocket Lake

Socket: LGA 1200

Cores/Threads: 6/12

Base Frequency: 2.6GHz

Top Boost Frequency: 4.4GHz

TDP: 65W

Reasons to buy

+Solid gaming and application performance+PCIe 4.0+Bundled cooler+Memory overclocking

Reasons to avoid

-Power consumption

The Core i5-11400 is the best budget chip on the market, largely because AMD's only competing chip comes in the form of the two-year-old Ryzen 5 3600 that can't compete with the more modern 11400. In gaming, the $182 Core i5-11400 delivers a blowout victory over the Ryzen 5 3600 that often retails for $200 or more. In fact, you can pick up the graphics-less Core i5-11400F for $157, which is a steal given this level of gaming performance. (Remember, the 11400F will perform the same as the non-F model, but you lose QuickSync.) 

Taken as a whole, the Core i5-11400 has a better blend of performance throughout our full suite of application tests, too. The 11400's large lead in single-threaded work is impressive, and its only deficiencies in threaded work come when it is topped with its stock cooler. The 11400 roughly matches the 3600 in threaded work with a better cooler, even with the power limits strictly enforced, while removing those limits gives the 11400 uncontested lead.

The Core i5-11400 supports the PCIe 4.0 interface. Additionally, B-series motherboards, which make the best pairing with this chip, support both memory overclocking and lifting the power limits, both of which yield huge dividends with this chip while also giving enthusiasts room to tinker.  You'll have to overlook the higher power consumption if you go with the Core i5-11400, especially if you remove the power limits. Intel's stock cooler is also largely worthless for enthusiasts, so you should budget for a better cooler. 

 Read: Intel Core i5-11400 Review

5. AMD Ryzen 3 3300X

Budget Best CPU for Gaming

Specifications

Architecture: Zen 2

Socket: AM4

Cores/Threads: 4/8

Base Frequency: 3.8GHz

Top Boost Frequency: 4.3GHz

TDP: 65W

Reasons to buy

+Low pricing+Great gaming performance+Solder TIM+Overclocking ceiling+PCIe 4.0 interface+Power efficient

Reasons to avoid

-Lackluster bundle cooler

The Ryzen 3 3300X is a hard chip to find because it is simply such a great deal. But if you do manage to nab one anywhere near its $120 MSRP, it's impossible to beat at its price point. The chip unlocks a new level of performance for budget gamers with four cores and eight threads that can push low- to mid-range graphics cards to their fullest. This new processor wields the Zen 2 architecture paired with the 7nm process to push performance to new heights while enabling new features for low-end processors, like access to the speedy PCIe 4.0 interface. The 3300X's four cores tick at a 3.8 GHz clock rate and boost to 4.3 GHz, providing snappy performance in lightly threaded applications, like games.

AMD includes a bundled Wraith Spire cooler with the processor. Still, you might consider budgeting in a better low-end cooler to unlock the full performance, particularly if you are overclocking. Speaking of which, the Ryzen 3 3300X can overclock to the highest all-core frequencies we've seen with a Ryzen 3000-series processor, making it a great chip for enthusiasts. Unlike AMD's other current-gen Ryzen 3 processors, you'll need to pair this processor with a discrete GPU, but the low price point leaves extra room in the budget for a more capable graphics card.

You can stick with the value theme and drop this capable chip into existing X470 of B450 motherboards, but you'll lose access to the PCIe 4.0 interface in exchange for a lower price point. Better yet, AMD has its new B550 motherboards on offer. These new motherboards support the PCIe 4.0 interface but provide lower entry-level pricing that's a better fit for this class of processor.

Read: AMD Ryzen 3 3300X Review

6. AMD Ryzen 5 5600G

Entry-Level Best CPU for Gaming

Specifications

Architecture: Zen 3

Socket: AM4

Cores/Threads: 6/12

Base Frequency: 3.9GHz

Top Boost Frequency: 4.4GHz

TDP: 65W

Reasons to buy

+Stellar price-to-performance ratio+Faster Zen 3 CPU cores+Passable 1080p, solid 720p+Excellent power consumption and efficiency+Great overclocking headroom+Bundled cooler+Compatible with some AM4 motherboards

Reasons to avoid

-PCIe 3.0 connectivity

The Ryzen 5 5600G comes to market during the worst GPU shortage in history, so many users will upgrade to this chip and use its potent integrated graphics for gaming until GPU pricing improves. The Ryzen 5 5600G lives up to that bill, too, stepping into the arena as the new value champ for APUs, which are chips that come with strong enough integrated graphics that they don't require a discrete GPU for light gaming, albeit at lowered quality settings.

At $259, the Ryzen 5 5600G gives you 96% of the gaming performance on integrated graphics than its more expensive sibling, the $359 Ryzen 7 5700G, but for 30% less cash. That makes it the best value  APU on the market. As long as you're willing to sacrifice fidelity and resolution, and keep your expectations in check, the Ryzen 5 5600G's Vega graphics have surprisingly good performance in gaming. The 5600G's Vega graphics served up comparatively great 1280x720 gaming across numerous titles, but options become more restricted at 1080p. Of course, you can get away with 1080p gaming, but you'll need to severely limit the fidelity settings with most titles.

With eight cores and 16 threads that operate at a 3.9 GHz base and boost up to 4.4 GHz, the Ryzen 5 5600G also offers solid performance for its price point in standard desktop PC applications. The chip also comes with a bundled Wraith Stealth cooler, sweetening the value prop, and drops into existing 500-series and some 400-series motherboards, though support on the latter will vary by vendor.

Read: AMD Ryzen 5 5600G Review

If your budget is tight and you're looking to build a system for modest gaming, you should check out our Best Cheap CPUs feature. Some of those chips can deliver passable gaming performance without a graphics card, and their prices start at just $55 (£40).

Deals on the Best CPUs

Whether you're buying one of the best CPUs we listed above or one that didn't quite make the cut, you may find some savings by checking our list of coupon codes, especially our lists of Newegg promo codes and Micro Center coupons.

Sours: https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/best-cpus,3986.html
  1. Century puppy farm
  2. Helltaker level vii
  3. Lifted 2wd suburban

The best Ryzen CPU: Which Ryzen processor should you buy?

AMD is dominating the desktop market in 2021. The best Ryzen CPUs represent excellent value for their money, offering high core counts and blistering clock speeds at reasonable prices. The most recent Ryzen 5000 range includes processors that can go toe to toe with the best from rival Intel. The question is: Which CPU should you pick up?

The Ryzen family is broken down into four distinct branches, targeting the entry-level, mainstream, performance, and high-end enthusiast sectors of the market — otherwise known as Ryzen 3, Ryzen 5, Ryzen 7, and Ryzen 9. They’re all great chips in their own ways, but some certainly offer more value than others, and for many, the most powerful chips will be complete overkill.

For most people, we recommend the Ryzen 5 5600X thanks to the excellent value for money it presents.

The best Ryzen CPUs

AMD Ryzen 3 3200G

AMD has always offered great value for money at the lower end of the CPU spectrum, and that old adage is just as true with its Ryzen CPUs. AMD offered a wide range of budget-conscious chips with its first Ryzen CPUs, including great standouts like the Ryzen 3 1200 and Ryzen 3 1300X. When we paired them up with an MSI Gaming X RX 580 and the beefy Zotac GTX 1080 Ti AMP! Edition, we found them to be very capable.

The 3DMark synthetic results delivered what we would expect: Better CPUs provided higher scores. But in gaming tests, the 1200 and 1300X showed themselves able to deliver solid frame rates that were, in many cases, pretty close to much more expensive Ryzen CPUs.

While we wouldn’t recommend those CPUs today, these are important results because they are roughly comparable to the general compute performance of AMD’s more recent APUs, the 2200G, 2400G, and 3200G. Those chips are not only fantastically affordable at between $80 and $120, but they come with reasonably capable onboard graphics, too.

If you have a graphics card or plan to buy one, The Ryzen 3 3100 and Ryzen 5 3600 are both reasonable alternatives, if you can find them in stock. They’re better CPUs than their APU cousins, so opt for that if you have other GPU plans in mind. But if you want an all-in-one, affordable package for budget gaming, the Ryzen 3 3200G is our favorite at this price.

AMD Ryzen 5 5600X

AMD comes into its own in the midrange price bracket, where the Ryzen 5 5600X is situated. It’s more expensive than our previous recommendation — the Ryzen 5 3600 — though it comes with the “X” tag, translating to higher clock speeds. This six-core, 12-thread part is rated for 3.7GHz on its base clock and able to boost up to 4.6GHz, so it has plenty of juice for gaming, video and photo editing, and even light 3D modeling.

Price is the biggest limiting factor right now, with AMD releasing the 5600X at $50 higher than the 3600X. You can save $50 to $100 (depending on sales) by going with AMD’s last-gen part, and you’ll get most of the performance of the 5600X. The two processors are equal in core and thread counts, and the base clock is even a little higher on the 3600X. However, the 5600X uses AMD’s new Zen 3 architecture, which features memory and IPC improvements over the 3000-series CPUs.

We wouldn’t recommend going further back than the 3000-series, however. The third generation of Ryzen processors brought Zen 2, vastly improving the performance and stability of AMD’s platform. If price is a concern, you can save with a 3600X, or you can buy a higher-end CPU from the previous generation. The Ryzen 7 3700X — our previous pick for the next section — is in stock at most retailers for at or around $300.

Not that you need to shop too much. At $300, the Ryzen 5 5600X is an absolute powerhouse, able to handle gaming and productivity workloads without breaking a sweat. Note, however, that the 5600X is out of stock as of late 2020, as are all 5000-series processors. If you need a CPU now, we recommend the Ryzen 5 3600X or Ryzen 7 3700X for this price bracket.

AMD Ryzen 7 5800X

The Ryzen 5 5600X is great for gaming with some productivity on the side. If productivity is closer to your main course, you’ll want a Ryzen 7 5800X. The 7-series part comes with eight cores and 16 threads while featuring the same IPC and memory improvements as the more affordable CPU. It also requires a lot more power — 105 watts to 65 watts — and boosts higher, with a base clock of 3.8GHz and a max boost clock of 4.7GHz.

It’s easy to see why the 5800X requires so much power, too. In gaming, the 5800X handily beats Intel’s best while matching the more expensive Ryzen 9-series parts. If you’re using a last-gen GPU like the 5700XT or RTX 2080 — a likely case, given Nvidia’s persistent 30-series stock issues — you won’t notice much of a difference between a 5800X and, say, a 5900X in gaming. CPU-bound games like Civilization VI show a slight advantage to the 5900X, though most games are GPU-bound, and without Nvidia or AMD’s latest, you won’t see a notable difference between the two processors.

There are quite a few differences when it comes to other tasks, however. In certain multi-threaded workloads, last-gen’s Ryzen 9 3900X can outperform the 5800X (and you can find the 3900X for around the same price). However, the 5800X, along with all 5000-series chips, wipes the floor with Ryzen 3000 when it comes to single-core performance.

If you need a processor right now, the Ryzen 9 3900X is a great choice with its recent price drop to $400. If you don’t mind waiting a bit, however, the 5800X shows some significant improvements in single-core performance while matching or slightly trailing the 3900X in non-gaming workloads.

AMD Ryzen 9 5900X

AMD didn’t pull too many punches with its 5000-series processors, and the Ryzen 9 5900X showcases that. It matches last-gen’s 3900X in core and thread count, clocking in at 12 cores and 24 threads, though with a slightly reduced clock speed. The 5900X starts at 3.7GHz and can boost up to 4.8GHz. Although the two processors look identical on paper, the 5900X has AMD’s aforementioned Zen 3 improvements.

In gaming, the 5900X beats Intel’s i9-10900K — probably the best gaming CPU on the market — in most titles, and often surpasses the 3900X, if only by a hair. With a little overclocking, Intel’s current i9 offering still wins the day. Gaming benchmarks don’t say much about the 5900X, however. At most, they tell us that AMD is finally catching up to Intel. If you’re only concerned with gaming, the 5900X is overkill, and benchmarks showcase that. Where there is a difference between last-gen’s 3900X and 10900K to the 5900X, it’s minor.

When you switch up your workloads, that’s when you’ll really get a glimpse at the 5900X’s power capabilities. In everything from 3D rendering in Blender to Cinebench to file decompression, the 5900X maintains a sizable lead over the 3900X. Which, we know, is a bold statement to make, considering that the 3900X stacks up against every other device in Intel’s catalog. If you’re operating from a single-core workload, you’ll notice the differences even more starkly. AMD’s IPC improvements show in single-core benchmarks, with the 5900X taking down Intel’s top CPUs in almost every test.

For AMD’s latest Ryzen 9 processor, you should be prepared to drop an extra $50 at checkout. The price rose from $499 to $549. That said, even at that price, you’ll find the 5900X is an excellent tool. And if you have a bit more wiggle room in your budget, consider buying the 5950X. If you’re able to take advantage of the 24 threads with the 5900X fully, you’ll definitely appreciate the 5950X’s 32 threads. 

Finding these processors on stock shelves, though, is still an issue. If you want a processor now, you’ll find that the 3900X and 3900XT perform pretty close to the 5900X, and they clock in at about $400 (which is $150 less than the alternative option). The good news about the Ryzen 9 3950X processor is that it sells for under $700 more often these days. So, while it can cost you a bit more than the other processors in this particular series, its performance is at least on par with that of the 5900X.

Editors' Recommendations

Sours: https://www.digitaltrends.com/computing/best-ryzen-cpu/
I Ordered a FAKE Ryzen 5 3600 from Best Buy

You can buy AMD's Ryzen 5000 chips with Radeon graphics on August 5th

AMD's Ryzen 5000-series APUs intrigued us when they were announced in April. They bring together the company's latest Zen 3 processor core with Vega 8 Radeon graphics on a single chip. That combination of performance would be great for a tiny desktop, especially if you need to handle a bit of gaming on the side. But, when they were first announced, AMD said the Ryzen 7 5700G and Ryzen 5 5600G chips would only be available on pre-built systems. Today at Computex, AMD officially announced that consumers will be able to buy the 5600G and 5700G on August 5th for $259 and $359, respectively.

That puts the 5700G — an 8-core, 16-thread chip that tops out 4.6GHz — well below the popular 5800X, which goes for around $449. The six-core, 12-thread 5600G, meanwhile, is a slight value play against the $299 5600X. AMD says the 5700G is up to 63 percent faster than Intel's comparable Core i7-11700 when it comes video editing with DaVinci Resolve 4K. As for gaming, the company claims it's nearly 2.5 times faster in Rogue Company while playing in 1080p with high settings. 

As usual, we'd have to test these chips ourselves to confirm AMD's claims. But given how well the 4000-series APUs performed, I wouldn't be surprised if its Radeon graphics continue to trounce Intel's integrated hardware. As for why you'd buy one of these things, they may be a good option for PC builders who can't yet get their hands on a powerful discrete GPU. The Vega 8 graphics should let you get some light 1080p gaming in, especially for less demanding titles.

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.
Sours: https://www.engadget.com/amd-ryzen-5700g-5600g-apu-radeon-sale-030010401.html

Buy ryzen

Alienware m15 Ryzen™ Edition R5 Gaming Laptop

FPS is provided by UL

Compare

ALIENWARE M15 R5 RYZEN® GAMING LAPTOP

Estimated Value

$1,393.98

Dell Price$1,379.99

You Save $13.99

Free Delivery

AMD Ryzen™ 7 5800H

Windows 11 Home

NVIDIA® GeForce RTX™ 3050 Ti 4GB GDDR6

8GB DDR4 3200MHz

256GB PCIe M.2 SSD

15.6-in. display

Starting at 5.34 lbs

First month subscription Premium Support included.

Financing

No interest if paid in full within 12 mos on $499+^

Interest will be charged to your account from the transaction posting date if the purchase balance is not paid in full within 12 mos.

See DetailsApply for Credit

Up to $41 back in rewards

Order Code wnr5m15eytns

  • Processor

    Help Me Choose

    AMD Ryzen™ 7 5800H (8-Core, 20MB Total Cache, up to 4.4 GHz Max Boost Clock)

  • Operating System

    Help Me Choose
  • Graphics Cardi

    Help Me Choose

    NVIDIA® GeForce RTX™ 3050 Ti 4GB GDDR6

  • Display

    Help Me Choose

    15.6" FHD (1920 x 1080) 165Hz 3ms with ComfortView Plus

  • Memoryi

    Help Me Choose
  • Hard Drive

    Help Me Choose
  • Case & Color

    Dark Side of the Moon with High Endurance Clear Coat and Silky Smooth Finish

  • Microsoft Office

    Help Me Choose

    No Microsoft Office License Included 30 day Trial Offer Only

    Microsoft® Office Home and Student 2021

    Microsoft® Office Home and Business 2021

    Microsoft® Office Professional 2021

    Microsoft® Office Home & Business 2021 + Adobe Acrobat Standard 2020

    Show all OptionsShow Less
  • Security Software

    Help Me Choose

    No Anti-virus Requested

    McAfee LiveSafe Consumer 12 Month Subscription

    McAfee LiveSafe Consumer 36 Month Subscription

    Show all OptionsShow Less
  • Protect your purchasei - View Support offers below

    Help Me Choose

    Monthly Subscription Premium Support

    1 Year Hardware Service with Onsite In-Home Service After Remote Diagnosis

    1 Year Premium Support

    2 Years Premium Support

    3 Years Premium Support

    4 Years Premium Support

    1 Year Premium Support Plus

    2 Years Premium Support Plus

    3 Years Premium Support Plus

    4 Years Premium Support Plus

    Monthly Subscription Premium Support Plus

    Show all OptionsShow Less
  • Accidental Damage Service

    Help Me Choose

    None

    1 Year Accidental Damage Service

    2 Year Accidental Damage Service

    3 Year Accidental Damage Service

    4 Year Accidental Damage Service

    Show all OptionsShow Less
  • Keyboard

    Alienware mSeries 4-Zone AlienFX RGB keyboard

  • Ports

    2 SuperSpeed USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type A ports
    1 SuperSpeed USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type C port
    1 SuperSpeed USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type A port
    1 HDMI 2.1 Output
    1 Power DC In C port
    1 2.5Gbps rated RJ-45 Ethernet port
    1 Global Headset jack

  • Slots

  • Dimensions & Weight

    1.Height (Front): 0.47" (12mm) | Height (Peak): 0.8996" (22.85mm) | Height (Rear): 0.7579" (19.25mm) | 2. Width: 14.02" (356.2mm) | 3. Depth: 10.73" (272.5mm) |Lowest weight: 5.34lbs (2.42kgs)i | Maximum weight: 5.93lbs (2.69kgs)i

  • Camera

    Integrated Camera Detail:
    Alienware HD (1280x720 resolution) camera with dual-array microphones (Standard)
    Alienware HD (1280x720 resolution) camera with dual-array microphones and Windows Hello IR support
    AlienFX Lighting Detail:
    Programmable with up to 16.8 million distinct colors

  • Audio and Speakers

    Stereo speakers, Realtek ALC3254 with A-Volute Nahimic audio processing software – Integrated in Alienware Sound Center (AWSC), 2 W x 2 = 4 W total

  • Chassis

    Based on Alienware's Legend industrial design language
    Engineered with Alienware Cryo-Tech Cooling technology
    Constructed with copper alloy thermal components

  • Wireless

    Help Me Choose

    Killer™ Wi-Fi 6 AX1650 802.11ax 2x2 Wireless LAN and Bluetooth 5.2

  • Regulatory Compliance

Estimated Value

$1,393.98

Dell Price$1,379.99

You Save $13.99

Free Delivery

Financing

No interest if paid in full within 12 mos on $499+^

Interest will be charged to your account from the transaction posting date if the purchase balance is not paid in full within 12 mos.

See DetailsApply for Credit

Up to $41 back in rewards

Order Code wnr5m15eytns

Compare

ALIENWARE M15 R5 RYZEN® GAMING LAPTOP

Estimated Value

$1,493.98

Dell Price$1,479.99

You Save $13.99

Free Delivery

AMD Ryzen™ 7 5800H

Windows 11 Home

NVIDIA® GeForce RTX™ 3050 Ti 4GB GDDR6

16GB, 8GBx2, DDR4, 3200MHz

256GB PCIe M.2 SSD

15.6-in. display

Starting at 5.34 lbs

First month subscription Premium Support included.

Financing

No interest if paid in full within 12 mos on $499+^

Interest will be charged to your account from the transaction posting date if the purchase balance is not paid in full within 12 mos.

See DetailsApply for Credit

Up to $44 back in rewards

Order Code wnr5m15eqpcs

  • Processor

    Help Me Choose

    AMD Ryzen™ 7 5800H (8-Core, 20MB Total Cache, up to 4.4 GHz Max Boost Clock)

  • Operating System

    Help Me Choose
  • Graphics Cardi

    Help Me Choose

    NVIDIA® GeForce RTX™ 3050 Ti 4GB GDDR6

  • Display

    Help Me Choose

    15.6" FHD (1920 x 1080) 165Hz 3ms with ComfortView Plus

  • Memoryi

    Help Me Choose

    16GB, 8GBx2, DDR4, 3200MHz

  • Hard Drive

    Help Me Choose
  • Case & Color

    Dark Side of the Moon with High Endurance Clear Coat and Silky Smooth Finish

  • Microsoft Office

    Help Me Choose

    No Microsoft Office License Included 30 day Trial Offer Only

    Microsoft® Office Home and Student 2021

    Microsoft® Office Home and Business 2021

    Microsoft® Office Professional 2021

    Microsoft® Office Home & Business 2021 + Adobe Acrobat Standard 2020

    Show all OptionsShow Less
  • Security Software

    Help Me Choose

    No Anti-virus Requested

    McAfee LiveSafe Consumer 12 Month Subscription

    McAfee LiveSafe Consumer 36 Month Subscription

    Show all OptionsShow Less
  • Protect your purchasei - View Support offers below

    Help Me Choose

    Monthly Subscription Premium Support

    1 Year Hardware Service with Onsite In-Home Service After Remote Diagnosis

    1 Year Premium Support

    2 Years Premium Support

    3 Years Premium Support

    4 Years Premium Support

    1 Year Premium Support Plus

    2 Years Premium Support Plus

    3 Years Premium Support Plus

    4 Years Premium Support Plus

    Monthly Subscription Premium Support Plus

    Show all OptionsShow Less
  • Accidental Damage Service

    Help Me Choose

    None

    1 Year Accidental Damage Service

    2 Year Accidental Damage Service

    3 Year Accidental Damage Service

    4 Year Accidental Damage Service

    Show all OptionsShow Less
  • Keyboard

    Alienware mSeries 4-Zone AlienFX RGB keyboard

  • Ports

    2 SuperSpeed USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type A ports
    1 SuperSpeed USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type C port
    1 SuperSpeed USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type A port
    1 HDMI 2.1 Output
    1 Power DC In C port
    1 2.5Gbps rated RJ-45 Ethernet port
    1 Global Headset jack

  • Slots

  • Dimensions & Weight

Sours: https://www.dell.com/en-us/shop/dell-laptops/alienware-m15-ryzen-edition-r5-gaming-laptop/spd/alienware-m15-r5-laptop
Сборка ПК без видеокарты. Октябрь 2021 года! Игровой компьютер на Intel \u0026 AMD

Where to buy AMD Ryzen 9 5900X and 5950X: find available stock here

If you're here to ask where to buy the AMD Ryzen 9 5900X and 5950X chips, you're in luck. Not only are these high-end CPUs readily available now, after being out of stock for so long, but they're also cheaper than they've ever been – below their list price, in fact.

Believe it or not, both the AMD Ryzen 9 5900X and 5950X are cheaper than their suggested retail price, especially in the US. The AMD Ryzen 9 5900X, for example, is available on Amazon and Best Buy for $499 and on Scan for £478. The 5950X, on the other hand, can now be found for $749 on B&H and Amazon.

This is excellent news to AMD fans and those looking to make the switch from Intel. Since AMD has done an amazing job with its CPUs, including the Ryzen 5000 series, now might just be the time to upgrade. We're here to help you figure out where to buy the AMD Ryzen 9 5900X and 5950X at the best price available.

AMD Ryzen 9 5900X stock: try these retailers

AMD Ryzen 9 5950X stock: try these retailers

The AMD Ryzen 9 5950X costs $799 (around £620, AU$1,100), and the AMD Ryzen 9 5900X goes for $549 (around £420, AU$760). Some retailers look like they will slightly undercut these prices, so as long as there's stock, you should check a few stores to see which one offers the best price.

As soon as we see more retailers off the CPUs for sale, we'll update this page.

Get the best AMD Ryzen 9 5900X and AMD Ryzen 9 5950X deals before anyone else!

We'll send you pre-order details and the best AMD Ryzen 9 5900X,AMD Ryzen 9 5950X deals as soon as they're available.

No spam, we promise. You can unsubscribe at any time and we'll never share your details without your permission.

We'll list all the latest AMD Ryzen 9 5950X and AMD Ryzen 9 5900X stock below as soon as it's available. Our built-in price comparison tool will update with the best prices for these CPUs.

Where to buy AMD Ryzen 9 5900X in the US

Orders for the AMD Ryzen 9 5900X went live in the US on November 5, so check back here to see who has stock of the new CPU.

AMD Ryzen 9 5900X deals at B&H
B&H has a listing for the CPU for $539, and it's in stock and available for purchase.View Deal

Sours: https://www.techradar.com/deals/where-to-buy-amd-ryzen-9-5900x-and-5950x-find-stock-here

You will also like:

You, and we will celebrate the New Year, I will borrow money, no problem. Slavka digested what I heard. - I wanted to transfer you from the steering-signalmen closer to my compartment, to bring it into mechanics.



16283 16284 16285 16286 16287