Gongora last name

Gongora last name DEFAULT

Góngora Surname

738,530th

Most Common

surname in the World

Approximately 391 people bear this surname

Most prevalent in:

Mexico

Highest density in:

Spain

Góngora Surname Definition:

The etymology of this word is uncertain but it is probable that "gong" comes from the Germanic word "gund" which means battle.

Navarrese name extended throughout Spain during Reconquest. New house founded in Cordoba.

The alternate forms: Gongora (73,016), Gòngora (10) & Gôngora (5) are calculated separately.

Góngora Surname Meaning

From Where Does The Surname Originate? meaning and history

The etymology of this word is uncertain but it is probable that "gong" comes from the Germanic word "gund" which means battle.

Navarrese name extended throughout Spain during Reconquest. New house founded in Cordoba.

Spanish Surnames In The Southwestern United States (1978) by Richard Donovon Woods

DNA test information

Góngora Last Name Facts

Where Does The Last Name Góngora Come From? nationality or country of origin

Góngora is held by more people in Mexico than any other country or territory. It can also be rendered as a variant: Gongora, Gòngora or Gôngora. Click here for further potential spellings of Góngora.

How Common Is The Last Name Góngora? popularity and diffusion

The surname Góngora is the 738,530th most frequent surname globally It is held by around 1 in 18,638,225 people. Góngora occurs mostly in The Americas, where 71 percent of Góngora reside; 47 percent reside in North America and 45 percent reside in Hispano-North America.

The last name Góngora is most numerous in Mexico, where it is carried by 177 people, or 1 in 701,278. In Mexico it is mostly found in: Yucatán, where 34 percent live, Campeche, where 10 percent live and Nuevo León, where 7 percent live. Aside from Mexico this last name is found in 25 countries. It also occurs in Spain, where 26 percent live and Argentina, where 5 percent live.

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The name statistics are still in development, sign up for information on more maps and data

  • Surnames are taken as the first part of an person's inherited family name, caste, clan name or in some cases patronymic
  • Descriptions may contain details on the name's etymology, origin, ethnicity and history. They are largely reproduced from 3rd party sources; diligence is advised on accepting their validity - more information
  • Name distribution statistics are generated from a global database of over 4 billion people - more information
  • Heatmap: Dark red means there is a higher occurrence of the name, transitioning to light yellow signifies a progressively lower occurrence. Clicking on selected countries will show mapping at a regional level
  • Rank: Name are ranked by incidence using the ordinal ranking method; the name that occurs the most is assigned a rank of 1; name that occur less frequently receive an incremented rank; if two or more name occur the same number of times they are assigned the same rank and successive rank is incremented by the total preceeding names
  • Ethnic group cannot necessarily be determined by geographic occurrence
  • Similar: Names listed in the "Similar" section are phonetically similar and may not have any relation to Góngora
  • To find out more about this surname's family history, lookup records on Family​Search, My​Heritage, FindMyPast and Ancestry. Further information may be obtained by DNA analysis
Sours: https://forebears.io

There are many indicators that the name Gongora may be of Jewish origin, emanating from the Jewish communities of Spain and Portugal.

When the Romans conquered the Jewish nation in 70 CE, much of the Jewish population was sent into exile throughout the Roman Empire. Many were sent to the Iberian Peninsula. The approximately 750,000 Jews living in Spain in the year 1492 were banished from the country by royal decree of Ferdinand and Isabella. The Jews of Portugal, were banished several years later. Reprieve from the banishment decrees was promised to those Jews who converted to Catholicism. Though some converted by choice, most of these New-Christian converts were called CONVERSOS or MARRANOS (a derogatory term for converts meaning pigs in Spanish), ANUSIM (meaning "coerced ones" in Hebrew) and CRYPTO-JEWS, as they secretly continued to practice the tenets of the Jewish faith.

Our research has found that the family name Gongora is cited with respect to Jews & Crypto-Jews in at least 1 bibliographical, documentary, or electronic references:

Secrecy and Deceit: The Religion of the Crypto-Jews, by David Gitlitz

Despite the increased attention given to Hispano-Jewish topics, and the "conversos" or Crypto-Jews in particular, this is the first thorough compilation of their customs and practices. The author has culled from Inquisition documents and other sources to paint a portrait of the richness and diversity of Crypto-Jewish practices in Spain, Portugal, and the New World. The history of Spanish Jews, or Sephardim, stretches back to biblical times. The Jews of Spain and Portugal made formative contributions to all Hispanic cultures, the impact of which is first being measured and recognized today. The Sephardim experienced a Golden Age in Iberia between 900-1100, during which they acted as the intermediaries between the rival political and cultural worlds of Islam and Christianity. This Golden Age ended with the Reconquest of Spain by Catholic overlords, though for another 300 years the Jews continued to contribute to Iberian life. In 1391 and again in 1492, intense and violent social pressures were put upon the Jews to join the larger Christian community. Many Jews converted, often unwillingly. In 1492 the remaining Jews were exiled from Spain. The converted Jews (Conversos) became an underclass in Spanish society. Many of them clung tenaciously to Jewish practices in the face of torture and death at the hands of the Inquisition. Having lost contact with other Jews, these people developed a religion which was an admixture of Catholic and Jewish rituals. David Gitlitz examines these practices in detail and attempts to answer the question of whether the Conversos were in fact Jewish. Gitlitz's research is exhaustive. He has combed through thousands of Inquistion records, showing that a sense of "Jewishness" if not Jewish practice remained a core value of many Spaniards' lives well into the 1700s. Gitlitz is convincing in showing that the Inquisition unwittingly aided crypto-Jews in perpetuating themselves by publishing Edicts of Faith. Essentially checklists for informers, they described the behavior of "Judaizers" (sometimes the practices listed were absurd or simply erroneous). These, ironically, were used by Judaizers as guides to religious behavior. It is revealing that as the Inquisition faded, crypto-Judaism waned, though never totally vanished. Gitlitz's knowledge and research on the subject is encyclopedic. The book is written in a "textbook" style which makes it somewhat technical and dry, though it is enlivened by excerpts from Inquisition records, which Gitlitz has apparently chosen for their interest, irony, unintended comedy, or spiritedness. It is difficult to imagine that human beings would face the tortures of the rack for not eating pork. That these same tortured people could summon the will to laugh at their executioners is something wondrous. The book includes the names of the Sephardim (and sometimes their residences too).


Around the 12th century, surnames started to become common in Iberia. In Spain, where Arab-Jewish influence was significant, these new names retained their old original structure, so that many of the Jewish surnames were of Hebrew derivation. Others were directly related to geographical locations and were acquired due to the forced wanderings caused by exile and persecution. Other family names were a result of conversion, when the family accepted the name of their Christian sponsor. In many cases, the Portuguese Jews bear surnames of pure Iberian/Christian origin. Many names have been changed in the course of migration from country to country. In yet other cases "aliases", or totally new names, were adopted due to fear of persecution by the Inquisition.

Sours: https://nameyourroots.com/home/names/Gongora
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Gongora Surname

7,782nd

Most Common

surname in the World

Approximately 73,016 people bear this surname

Most prevalent in:

Mexico

Highest density in:

Belize

The alternate forms: Góngora (391), Gòngora (10) & Gôngora (5) are calculated separately.

Gongora (38) may also be a first name.

Gongora Last Name Facts

Where Does The Last Name Gongora Come From? nationality or country of origin

The surname Gongora is found most frequently in Mexico. It may also appear as: Góngora, Gòngora or Gôngora. For other possible spellings of this surname click here.

How Common Is The Last Name Gongora? popularity and diffusion

The surname Gongora is the 7,782nd most frequently occurring surname worldwide, borne by approximately 1 in 99,808 people. It occurs mostly in The Americas, where 92 percent of Gongora live; 39 percent live in South America and 30 percent live in Hispano-North America. Gongora is also the 1,662,754th most frequently occurring first name worldwide. It is borne by 38 people.

The last name Gongora is most frequently occurring in Mexico, where it is borne by 21,883 people, or 1 in 5,672. In Mexico Gongora is most frequent in: Yucatán, where 42 percent reside, Quintana Roo, where 14 percent reside and Campeche, where 9 percent reside. Excluding Mexico this surname is found in 63 countries. It is also found in Colombia, where 16 percent reside and Cuba, where 11 percent reside.

Gongora Family Population Trend historical fluctuation

The occurrence of Gongora has changed through the years. In The United States the share of the population with the surname rose 20,527 percent between 1880 and 2014.

Gongora Last Name Statistics demography

In The United States those holding the Gongora last name are 41.95% more likely to be registered with the Democrat Party than the national average, with 95.18% registered with the political party.

The amount Gongora earn in different countries varies significantly. In Peru they earn 4.51% less than the national average, earning S/. 18,511 per year; in Colombia they earn 2.98% less than the national average, earning $22,025,000 COP per year; in United States they earn 7.75% less than the national average, earning $39,806 USD per year and in Canada they earn 29.03% less than the national average, earning $35,261 CAD per year.

Phonetically Similar Names

Search for Another Surname

The name statistics are still in development, sign up for information on more maps and data

  • Surnames are taken as the first part of an person's inherited family name, caste, clan name or in some cases patronymic
  • Name distribution statistics are generated from a global database of over 4 billion people - more information
  • Heatmap: Dark red means there is a higher occurrence of the name, transitioning to light yellow signifies a progressively lower occurrence. Clicking on selected countries will show mapping at a regional level
  • Rank: Name are ranked by incidence using the ordinal ranking method; the name that occurs the most is assigned a rank of 1; name that occur less frequently receive an incremented rank; if two or more name occur the same number of times they are assigned the same rank and successive rank is incremented by the total preceeding names
  • Ethnic group cannot necessarily be determined by geographic occurrence
  • Similar: Names listed in the "Similar" section are phonetically similar and may not have any relation to Gongora
  • To find out more about this surname's family history, lookup records on Family​Search, My​Heritage, FindMyPast and Ancestry. Further information may be obtained by DNA analysis
Sours: https://forebears.io
Clarion Alley Mural Project's Wall + Response: Justice for Luís D. Góngora Pat

Góngora (surname)

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Góngora is a Spanish surname of Navarran origin. People bearing the surname include:

  • Alonso de Góngora Marmolejo (1523–1575), Spanish conquistador and chronicler in Chile
  • Canek Vázquez Góngora (born 1979), Mexican politician
  • Carlos Góngora (born 1989), Ecuadorian amateur boxer
  • Efraín Aguilar Góngora (born 1964), Mexican politician
  • Genaro David Góngora (born 1937), Mexican jurist and member of Mexico's Supreme Court of Justice
  • Jorge Góngora (1906–1999), Peruvian footballer
  • Julián Angulo Góngora (born 1953), Mexican lawyer and politician
  • Luis de Góngora (1561–1627), Spanish lyric poet of the Siglo de Oro
  • Mario Góngora (1915–1985), Chilean historian
  • Martín Góngora (born 1980), Uruguayan footballer
  • Michael Góngora (born 1970), American politician
  • Sandra Góngora (born 1985), Mexican ten-pin bowler

Matronyms[edit]

See also[edit]

  • Gongora, orchid named after Antonio Caballero y Góngora
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G%C3%B3ngora_(surname)

Last name gongora

Yes, I definitely like it. Ksyusha moved the mounds to each other and lightly caressed them. And so. she breathed out barely audibly.

ORCHID SPOTLIGHT: GONGORA POWELLII

I kept thinking about it. until one day the flywheel of time with a signed contract fell on the floor of this cell right in front. Of me. past. '' This flywheel, '' he said, swinging the hourglass in front of the Gryffindors.

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I was fascinated by you only one. I look for your papillae for your lips, You gently stroke me between my legs, And I tremble under your pressure, A damask blade strives from the scabbard. We like this game more and more. And we crossed the limit. Palm walking along the bend of the thigh, Dived imperceptibly for a narrow fabric.



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